A Week in Review: 8/4/13 – 8/10/13

August 5, 2013

Air Force Supported Researchers Build All-Optical Switch and Transistor: The Path to All Optical Quantum Information Processing
The control of a single photon–the elementary quantum carrier of light and all forms of electromagnetic radiation–is seen as the Holy Grail of quantum computing.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123358534

The Molecular Scanner
Pitt invents the world’s smallest terahertz detector
http://www.news.pitt.edu/news/molecule-scanner

August 6, 2013

Altering organic molecules’ interaction with light
MIT Researchers discover a new platform that provides simple means to manipulate organic molecules’ emission, and may have important implications to organic light emitting devices and molecular biosensors
http://www.eurekaalert.org/pub_releases/2013-08/miot-aom080613.php

August 8, 2013

JILA researchers discover atomic clock can simulate quantum magnetism
Researchers at JILA have for the first time used an atomic clock as a quantum simulator, mimicking the behavior of a different, more complex quantum system
http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2013/08/08/jila-researchers-discover-atomic-clock-can-simulate-quantum-magnetism

 

A Week in Review: 7/7/13 – 7/13/13

July 8, 2013

Not-weak knots bolster carbon fiber
Large flakes of graphene oxide are the essential ingredient in a new recipe for robust carbon fiber created at Rice University. The fiber spun at Rice is unique for the strength of its knots. Most fibers are most likely to snap under tension at the knot, but Rice’s fiber demonstrates what the researchers refer to as “100 percent knot efficiency,” where the fiber is as likely to break anywhere along its length as at the knot.
http://news.rice.edu/2013/07/08/not-weak-knots-bolster-carbon-fiber-2/

Humboldt-Laureate Prof. Federico Capasso as Guest Scientist at the Marx-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics
In July 2013, the physicist Federico Capasso will join the Marx Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) as a guest scientist. Prof. Capasso is the Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics and a Vinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow in Electrical Engineering at Harvard University (Cambridge, MA USA). In May 2013, he was honoured with a Humboldt Research Award. This award is granted by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation to outstanding foreign academics at the peak of their careers. Award winners are invited to spend a period of six to twelve months on academic collaboration with specialist colleagues in Germany.
http://www.mpq.mpg.de/cms/mpq/en/news/awards/13_07_08.html  

July 9, 2013

Air Force Fiscal Year 2014 Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) BAA posted on Grants.gov
The Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) supports young scientists and engineers in Air Force relevant disciplines and is designed to promote innovative research in fields such as: energy, power and propulsion, materials interactions in extreme environments, aero-structure interactions and control, hierarchical design and characterization of materials, space architecture and protection, thermal control, mathematical, information and computer sciences, biology, behavioral sciences, plasma and quantum physics, theoretical and experimental physics, microwave and photonic systems, information and signal process, and materials-processing techniques. The awards foster creative basic research, enhance early career development of outstanding young investigators, and increase opportunities to recognize Air Force mission and challenges in science and engineering.
http://go.usa.gov/j5dm

July 11, 2013

Imperfect graphene renders ‘electrical highways’
Just an atom thick, 200 times stronger than steel and near-perfect conductor, graphene’s future in electronics is all but certain. But to make this carbon supermaterial useful, it needs to be a semiconductor– a material than can switch between insulating and conducting states, which forms the basis for all electronics today. Combining experiment and theory, Cornell researchers have moved a step closer to making graphene a useful, controllable material. They showed that when grown in stacked layers, graphene produces some specific defects that influence its conductivity.
http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/07/imperfect-graphene-renders-electrical-highways

A sound idea: Innovative lens takes shape as commercial product
On a late night in February 2011, two Princeton University researchers packed a small object into a box and set it out for the morning mail. The engineers had spent four years developing a new type of microscope lens that focuses in response to sound waves. They were sending their innovation to their first customer.
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S37/17/38C24/index.xml

A Week in Review: 6/23/13 – 6/29/13

June 24, 2013

New Scheme for Quantum Computing
Tom Wong, a graduate student in physics and David Meyer, professor of mathematics at the University of California, San Diego, have proposed a new algorithm for quantum computing that will speed a particular type of problem. But swifter calculations would come at the cost of greater physical resources devoted to precise timekeeping, their analysis has determined. This work was partially supported by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) as part of the Quantum Entanglement Science and Technology program and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research as part of the Transformational Computing in Aerospace Science and Engineering Initiative.
http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/new_scheme_for_quantum_computing

June 25, 2013

Air Force announces universities to receive research equipment awards
The Air Force announced today that 29 university researchers at 26 academic institutions have been selected to receive awards to support the purchase of research instrumentation. The 29 awards will total $12.7 million and are being made under the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP). These awards are the result of a merit competition for DURIP funding jointly conducted by the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. The awards announced today will be made by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Awards made by the Army Research Office and the Office of Naval Research were announced via www.defense.gov on 3 June 2013.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123353723

June 25, 2013

Inspiration from the reflective sides of silvery fish
An animal biophotonic structure provides a design pathway for a new class of polarization-insensitive, broadband multilayer mirror.
https://spie.org/x95080.xml?highlight=x2414&ArticleID=x95080

June 27, 2013

Two Wright State professors land coveted Air Force grants
Two professors from Wright State University have been awarded highly-competitive grants from the U.S. Air Force for research equipment.
http://www.bizjournals.com/dayton/news/2013/06/27/two-wright-state-professors-receive.html

June 28, 2013

Training intelligent systems to think on their own
The computing devices and software programs that enable the technology on which the modern world relies, says Hector Munoz-Avila, can be likened to adolescents. Thanks to advanced mathematical formulas known as algorithms, these systems, or agents, are now sufficiently intelligent to reason and to make responsible decisions–without adult supervision–in their own environments.
http://www4.lehigh.edu/news/newsarticle.aspx?Channel=%2fChannels%2fNews+2013&WorkflowItemID=10885714-16ce-43f1-bfda-5dc3d239c1b7

A Week in Review: 6/2/13 – 6/8/13

June 3, 2013

AF appoints first female chief scientist

The Air Force appointed the service’s first female chief scientist to lead the way in the technology and science fields. Dr. Mica Endsley assumed her new duties and responsibilities as the 34th chief scientist June 3 in support of Air Force senior leaders and Airmen across the service. “Having served on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board for many years, I’ve had the pleasure of working closely with the current and several former Air Force chief scientists,” Endsley said. “I know this is a tremendous opportunity to help the Air Force excel in its goal of maintaining the critical technological edge that gives our Airmen a strategic advantage.”
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123351006

June 3, 2013

Airmen show ‘cool careers’ in a new ad campaign

The Air Force Recruiting Service is currently developing an ad campaign to teach young adults about cool career opportunities in the Air Force community, with the goal to inspire young people to join the Air Force. They also plan to demonstrate that the Air Force offers the same science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) opportunities as the private sector. http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123350970

June 4, 2013

Air Force weapons experts to brief industry on near-term and far-term fuzing research

U.S. Air Force weapons experts will brief industry June 25 and June 26 on fuze technology research efforts for specific applications available for near-term transition, as well as on research programs in the mid- and far-terms. The Fuze Technology Days event will enable government and industry to discuss research and development efforts in fuzing technology, and encourage collaboration among attendees. Briefings will be by experts in the Air Force Research Laboratory Munitions Directorate at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.
http://www.militaryaerospace.com/articles/2013/06/USAF-Fuze-briefings.html

Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) Program BAA Released

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) Program BAA is released. Research proposals from HBCU/MI are reviewed by AFOSR Program Managers as part of their core program and may be funded from funds set aside by the AFOSR Director. Applications Due: August 9, 2013 The Department of Defense Research and Education Program for the HBCU/MI program is executed under the oversight of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (ASD(R&E)). It is administered by the Army Research Office (ARO), the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). Download the announcement at http://1.usa.gov/13HRSoa

Week in Review: 5/26/13 – 6/1/13

May 30, 2013

Computer simulations help scientists understand HIV-1 infection

Scientists have long been unable to fully explain how infections attack the body, nut now a team of researchers, including one from the University of Central Florida, has taken a step closer to understanding how the process works in HIV-1. The results mean that one day that knowledge may prevent infection. http://nanowerk.com/news2/biotech/newsid=30731.php

May 31, 2013

Even with Defects, Graphene is Strongest Material in the World

In a new study, published in Science May 31, 2013, Columbia Engineering researchers demonstrate that graphene, even if stitched together from many small crystalline grains, is almost as strong as graphene in its perfect crystalline form. This work resolves a contradiction between theoretical simulations, which predicted that grain boundaries can be strong, and earlier experiments, which indicated that they were much weaker than the perfect lattice. http://engineering.columbia.edu/even-defects-graphene-strongest-material-world

Week in Review: 5/19/13 – 5/25/13

May 21, 2013

Air Force Research Lab challenges students with real-world warfighter need

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has found a winning strategy for solving real world problems facing the warfighter. Each year AFRL poses a clearly defined problem to several universities and service academies, challenging them to compete for a “best solution” based upon certain criteria including system weight, ruggedness, time to employ, effectiveness, cost, and creativity. AFRL wins by collecting the great ideas that emerge from the competitions, while being introduced to some of our country’s finest up-and-coming engineers. University students win by experiencing real-world problem resolution while getting a chance to save the lives of servicemen and women. In addition, they’re able to see how fun it could be to work for AFRL! http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123349385

May 25, 2013

Shape-shifting Nanoparticles Flip from Sphere to Net in Response to Tumor Signal

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have designed tiny spherical particles to float easily through the bloodstream after injection, then assemble into a durable scaffold within the diseased tissue. An enzyme produced by a specific type of tumor can trigger the transformation of the spheres into netlike structures that accumulate at the site of a cancer, the team reports in the Journal Advanced Materials this week. http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/shape_shifting_nanoparticles_flip_from_sphere_to_net_in_response_to_tu

A Week in Review: 5/12/13 – 5/18/13

AFRL gains national recognition for STEM outreach

The Department of Defense needs to produce enough high-caliber science, technology, engineering and mathematics talent to ensure the U.S. maintains superiority in national defense. Fortunately, innovative Air Force STEM programs across the country are making a difference. http:/www.kirtland.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123348059

Two of Dr. Berman’s PI’s have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Naomi Halas, Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor of Chemistry, Physics and Bioengineering at Rice University and Sharon Hammes-Schiffer, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been elected 2013 fellows of NAS. Naomi Halas’ work has been creating tailored nanoparticles in order to control their optical and energy transfer properties. This work is having widespread impact in the areas of sensors, catalysts, water treatment, and even cancer phototherapy. Sharon Hammes-Schiffer’s work has focused on theoretical studies of chemical reactions, particularly proton-coupled electron transfer reactions which play an important role in energy storage, catalysis and photosynthesis, and could impact design of solar cells.

Rice University Professor Naomi Halas has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences – one of the highest honors that can be conferred upon a U.S. scientist or engineer. She is one of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates announced today in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. http://bioengineering.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=4294967599

Three faculty members at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been elected 2013 fellows of the National Academy of Sciences. Eduardo Fradkin, Martin Gruebele and Sharon Hammes-Schiffer are among the 84 new members and 21 foreign associates announced by the academy on April 30. http://www.news.illinois.edu/news/13/0430NAS_EduardoFradkin_MartinGruebele_SharonHammes-Schiffer.html