Week in Review: 5/22/16 – 5/28/16

May 27, 2016

Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics

Now, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has created the world’s fastest stretchable, wearable integrated circuits, an advance that could drive the Internet of Things and a much more connected, high-speed wireless world. Led by Zhenqiang “Jack” Ma, the Lynn H. Matthias Professor in Engineering and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor in electrical and computer engineering at UW-Madison, the researchers published details of these powerful, highly efficient integrated circuits today, May 27, 2016, in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160527190522.htm

May 26, 2016

Electrical properties of superconductor altered by ‘stretching’

A team led by Kyle Shen, associate professor of physics, and Darrell Schlom, the Herbert Fisk Johnson Professor of Industrial Chemistry, both members of the Kavli Institute for Nanoscale Science at Cornell, has shown the ability to alter the electrical properties of the unique material through the application of strain – stretching thin films of SRO on top of a single-crystal substrate. http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2016/05/electrical-properties-superconductor-altered-stretching

Doubling down on Schrödinger’s cat

Yale physicists have given Schrödinger’s famous cat a second box to play in, and the result may help further the quest for reliable quantum computing.
http://news.yale.edu/2016/05/26/doubling-down-schr-dinger-s-cat

May 23, 2016

Rice de-icer gains anti-icing properties

Rice University scientists have advanced their graphene-based de-icer to serve a dual purpose. The new material still melts ice from wings and wires when conditions get too cold. But if the air is above 7 degrees Fahrenheit, ice won’t form at all. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour gave its de-icer superhydrophobic (water-repelling) capabilities that passively prevent water from freezing above 7 degrees. The tough film that forms when the de-icer is sprayed on a surface is made of atom-thin graphene nanoribbons that are conductive, so the material can also be heated with electricity to melt ice and snow in colder conditions. http://news.rice.edu/2016/05/23/rice-de-icer-gains-anti-icing-properties-2

Foresight Institute Awards Feynman Prizes in Nanotechnology to Buehler, Simmons

Foresight Institute, a leading think tank and public interest organization focused on molecular nanotechnology, announced the 2015 winners for the prestigious Feynman Prizes, named in honor of pioneer physicist Richard Feynman, for experiment and theory in nanotechnology.
http://www.cbs8.com/story/32037386/foresight-institute-awards-feynman-prizes-in-nanotechnology-to-buehler-simmons

Rice de-icer gains anti-icing properties

Rice University scientists have advanced their graphene-based de-icer to serve a dual purpose. The new material still melts ice from wings and wires when conditions get too cold. But if the air is above 7 degrees Fahrenheit, ice won’t form at all. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour gave its de-icer superhydrophobic (water-repelling) capabilities that passively prevent water from freezing above 7 degrees. The tough film that forms when the de-icer is sprayed on a surface is made of atom-thin graphene nanoribbons that are conductive, so the material can also be heated with electricity to melt ice and snow in colder conditions. http://news.rice.edu/2016/05/23/rice-de-icer-gains-anti-icing-properties-2/