Week in Review: 12/28/14 – 1/3/15

December 30, 2014

First 3D Metamaterials will enable higher resolution ultrasound, stealth submarines and other applications
Researchers have developed the first three dimensional metamaterials by combining physico-chemical formulation and microfluidics technology. This is a new generation of soft metamaterials that are easier to shape. In their experiment, the researchers got ultrasonic oscillations to move backwards while the energy carried by the wave moved forwards. Their work opens up new prospects, especially for high-resolution imaging (ultrasonography).
http://nextbigfuture.com/2014/12/first-3d-metamaterials-will-enable.html

Top Breakthroughs Stories Of 2014
Artificial Muscle Spun From Fishing Line And Thread: Ordinary sewing thread can have superhuman power. That’s according to researchers at UT Dallas who discovered fishing line and sewing thread can be cheaply converted to powerful artificial muscles — no Rumpelstiltskin required.
http://breakthroughs.kera.org/top-breakthroughs-stories-of-2014/

December 29, 2014

Innovation, invention, and just plain cool
Granted, it is unlikely that the laser turret being developed by Lockheed Martin, the U.S. Air Force, and the University of Notre Dame will ever be an option on a general aviation aircraft, but you have to admit it’s pretty cool that the developers used a Falcon 10 to test a laser turret.
http://www.aopa.org/News-and-Video/All-News/2014/December/29/Top-Tech-of-2014

A Week in Review: 9/21/14 – 9/27/14

September 26, 2014

AFOSR welcomes new director, Dr. Thomas F. Christian
The Air Force Research Laboratory announced the appointment of a new director at the Air Force Office of Scientific Research in Arlington, Va.  Dr. Thomas F. Christian will join AFOSR as the 24th director of the agency, which boasts a 63-year history of continuously funding breakthrough basic research for the long-term benefit of the United States Air Force.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123426216

September 25, 2014

New Discovery Could Pave the Way for Spin-based Computing
Electricity and magnetism rule our digital world. Semiconductors process electrical information, while magnetic materials enable long-term data storage. A University of Pittsburgh research team has discovered a way to fuse these two distinct properties in a single material, paving the way for new ultrahigh density storage and computing architectures. This discovery was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Army Research Office. http://www.news.pitt.edu/news/new-discovery-could-pave-way-spin-based-computing

Penn Chemists Observe Key Reaction for Producing ‘Atmosphere’s Detergent’ Earth’s atmosphere is a complicated dance of molecules. The chemical output of plants, animals and human industry rise into the air and pair off in sequences of chemical reactions. Such processes help maintain the atmosphere’s chemical balance; for example, some break down pollutants emitted from the burning of fossil fuels. Understanding exactly how these reactions proceed is critical for predicting how the atmosphere will respond to environmental changes, but some of the steps of this dance are so quick that all of the molecules involved haven’t been measured in the wild. A University of Pennsylvania team has now observed one of these rapid atmospheric reactions in the lab.
http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/penn-chemists-observe-key-reaction-producing-atmosphere-s-detergent

September 23, 2014

Fluorescent Dyes Highlight Hard-to-Detect Damages in Composites
Current research at the National Institute of Standards and Technology is creating a process that uses fluorescence to detect both damage and water in composites, a first for composites. The first system utilizes Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), a method frequently used in molecular biology research to probe the interaction between proteins and other biopolymers. The second approach uses a mechanophore, a molecule that changes color in response to mechanical forces. http://compositesmanufacturingmagazine.com/2014/09/fluorescent-dyes-highlight-hard-detect-damages-composites/

September 22, 2014

Nature’s elegant and efficient vision systems can detect cancer
Mantis shrimp eyes are inspiring the design of new cameras that can detect a variety of cancers and visualise brain activity. University of Queensland research has found that the shrimp’s compound eyes are superbly tuned to detect polarised light, providing a streamlined framework for technology to mimic. The Australian Research Council, the Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development and the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research are funding the work. http://www.uq.edu.au/news/article/2014/09/nature%E2%80%99s-elegant-and-efficient-vision-systems-can-detect-cancer

Engineers show light can play seesaw at the nanoscale
University of Minnesota electrical engineering researchers have developed a unique nanoscale device that for the first time demonstrates mechanical transportation of light. The discovery could have major implications for creating faster and more efficient optical devices for computation and communication. The team’s research was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. The device was fabricated in the cleanroom at the Minnesota Nano Center at the University of Minnesota. http://discover.umn.edu/news/science-technology/engineers-show-light-can-play-seesaw-nanoscale

A Week in Review: 10/13/13 – 10/19/13

October 18, 2013

The Long Reach of Basic Research: The United States Air Force and the 2013 Nobel Physics Laureates
On 8 October it was announced that Francois Englert of Belgium and Peter Higgs of Great Britain won the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics for their theoretical discoveries on how subatomic particles acquire mass–and it was fifty years ago that the United States Air Force funded both of these eminent physicists in their search for what ultimately came to be called the Higgs Boson.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123367579

AFOSR Encourages International Basic Research Collaboration with Italy
Under the auspices of the US-Italy Joint Defense S&T Dialogue held in Washington, DC, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and the Embassy of Italy jointly organized a technical exchange meeting in Arlington, VA, with the objective of exploring basic science collaborations between the US and Italy in the areas of Materials, Sensors and Applied Mathematics.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123367582