Week in Review: 9/17/17 – 9/23/17

Technique spots warning signs of extreme events

Now engineers at MIT have devised a framework for identifying key patterns that precede an extreme event. The framework can be applied to a wide range of complicated, multidimensional systems to pick out the warning signs that are most likely to occur in the real world.

September 20, 2017

AFRL selects fellows from Materials and Manufacturing Directorate

Two scientists from the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate were recently chosen as Air Force Research Laboratory Fellows. Dr. Allan Katz, High Temperature Silicon-Carbide-Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites for Turbines program manager and Dr. Ajit Roy, Computational Nanomaterials principal engineer and group lead were two of six scientists selected as AFRL Fellows.

September 19, 2017

Squeezing light into infinitesimally thin lines

Researchers have demonstrated a new mode of electromagnetic wave, called a “line wave,” which travels along an infinitesimally thin line along the interface between two adjacent surfaces with different electromagnetic properties. The scientists expect that line waves will be useful for the efficient routing and concentration of electromagnetic energy, such as light, with potential applications in areas ranging from integrated photonics, sensing and quantum processes to future vacuum electronics.

The Goldilocks Wing: Popular Airfoil Design Defies Aerodynamic Standards

Since the Wright brothers took to the sky in 1903 aboard their notorious, dual-winged biplane, we have seen countless wing designs of various shapes and sizes used on aircraft. Each of these wings have a particular cross-section design, known as an airfoil, that follows the textbook standard relationship between lift and the angle of attack. However, Professor Geoff Spedding, of USC Viterbi’s Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department, found otherwise while performing careful experiments in the same standard conditions, but at a smaller scale. His results highlight the disparity between experiments, computations and aerodynamic models and how much work still needs to be done before reaching agreement as designers endeavor on small-scale flight – the next generation of drones.

September 18, 2017

Thin, flexible device could provide efficient cooling for mobile electronics – or people

Engineers and scientists from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and SRI International, a nonprofit research and development organization based in Menlo Park, California, have created a thin flexible device that could keep smartphones and laptop computers cool and prevent overheating.

 

A Week in Review: 11/16/14 – 11/22/14

November 20, 2014

New semiconductor device could lead to better photodetectors
UCLA researchers have developed a perovskite photodetector that could reduce manufacturing costs and improve the quality of medical and commercial light sensors. http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/new-semiconductor-device-could-lead-to-better-photodectectors

November 18, 2014

Hu, Leite Named Outstanding Engineer and Scientist of the Year (VIDEO) University of Maryland assistant professors Liangbing Hu and Marina Leite were named Maryland Outstanding Young Engineer and Maryland Outstanding Young Scientist in the academic sector, respectively, by the Maryland Science Center. Both awards are sponsored by the Maryland Academy of Sciences. http://www.mse.umd.edu/news/news_story.php?id=8672

November 17, 2014

First Genetic-Based Tool to Detect Circulating Cancer Cells in Blood
Northwestern University scientists now have demonstrated a simple but powerful tool that can detect live cancer cells in the bloodstream, potentially long before the cells could settle somewhere in the body and form a dangerous tumor. http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2014/11/first-genetic-based-tool-to-detect-circulating-cancer-cells-in-blood.html

Researcher elected to Australian Academy of Science Council
A University of Queensland researcher’s respected career designing unmanned aerial vehicles based on biologically inspired systems has seen him elected onto the Australian Academy of Science Council. The Queensland Brain Institute’s Professor Mandyam Srinivasan is one of five new researchers elected to the council, which promotes scientific knowledge and advice. http://www.uq.edu.au/news/article/2014/11/researcher-elected-australian-academy-of-science-council

Graphene/nanotube hybrid benefits flexible solar cells
Rice University scientists have invented a novel cathode that may make cheap, flexible dye-sensitized solar cells practical.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/11/17/graphenenanotube-hybrid-benefits-flexible-solar-cells/

Fulbright award takes computer scientist to France
As one of this year’s Fulbright Scholars, ASU computer science professor Arunabha Sen will have an opportunity to work with some of Europe’s leading experts in his field to advance research on wireless sensor networks, robot networks and radio-frequency identification (RFID) devices.
https://asunews.asu.edu/20141113-arun-sen-fulbright-award

A Week in Review: 3/2/14 – 3/8/14

March 3, 2014

World Leader in LCD Research Selected for National Award
A much-decorated UCF optics researcher who specializes in liquid crystal displays and is among the university’s top patent generators is being recognized again by the nation’s premier optics society. Shin-Tson Wu, Pegasus professor of optics, has been selected to receive the Esther Hoffman Beller Medal from The Optical Society (OSA) for his broad and significant impact to academia and industry in photonics education.
http://today.ucf.edu/world-leader-lcd-research-selected-national-award/

March 5, 2014

Dealing with Loss
There’s exciting news from JILA’s ultracold molecule collaboration. The Jin, Ye, Holland, and Rey groups have come up with new theory (verified by experiment) that explains the suppression of chemical reactions between potassium-rubidium (KRb) molecules in the KRb quantum simulator.
https://jila.colorado.edu/news-highlights/dealing-loss

March 6, 2014

Crystals Ripple in Response to Light
Light can trigger coordinated, wavelike motions of atoms in atom-thin layers of crystal, scientists have shown. The waves, called phonon polaritons, are far shorter than light waves and can be “tuned” to particular frequencies and amplitudes by varying the number of layers of crystal, they report in the early online edition of Science March 7.
http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/crystals_ripple_in_response_to_light

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend
University of California, Berkeley, physicist Dmitry Budker and his colleagues at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and UCLA have now shown that these diamond sensors can measure the tiny magnetic fields in high-temperature superconductors, providing a new tool to probe these much ballyhooed but poorly understood materials.
http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2014/03/06/colored-diamonds-are-a-superconductors-best-friend/

 

A Week in Review: 9/22/13 – 9/28/13

September 23, 2013

UCLA engineers develop a stretchable, foldable transparent electronic display
Imagine an electronic display nearly as clear as a window, or a curtain that illuminates the room or a smartphone screen that doubles in size, stretching like rubber. Now imagine all of these being made by the same material.
Researchers from UCLA’s Henry Samueli School Engineering and Applied Science have developed a transparent, elastic organic-emitting device, or OLED, that could one day make all these possible. The OLED can be repeatedly stretched, folded and twisted while still retaining its original shape.
http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/ucla-engineers-develop-a-stretchable-248397.aspx