Week in Review: Nov 22 – Nov 28

November 24, 2015

Stanford physicists set quantum record by using photons to carry messages from electrons over a distance of 1.2 miles
Researchers from Stanford have advanced a long-standing problem in quantum physics – how to send “entangled” particles over long distances.
http://news.stanford.edu/2015/11/24/cryptography-quantum-tangle-112415/

ECE alum receives 2016 IEEE Donald G. Fink Award
IEEE has awarded the 2016 IEEE Donald G. Fink Award to an international team of researchers that includes an alumnus of the department of electrical and computer engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The award is given for the outstanding survey, review, or tutorial paper in any of the IEEE Transactions, Journals, Magazines, or Proceedings. The team reported on a “bioinspired CMOS current-mode polarization imaging sensor based on the compound eye of the mantis shrimp” in the Proceedings of the IEEE. Among the potential applications for the sensor is the early diagnosis of cancerous lesions.
http://engineering.jhu.edu/ece/2015/11/24/ece-alum-receives-2016-ieee-donald-g-fink-award/#.V5EKIzZf1ER

AIAA honors UTA’s Frank Lewis with 2016 Intelligent Systems Award
The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics will honor professor Frank Lewis, head of the University of Texas at Arlington’s Advanced Controls and Sensors Group, with the society’s 2016 Intelligent Systems Award in recognition of his work to advance the capabilities of autonomous aircraft systems. http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-11/uota-ahu112415.php

A Week in Review: 9/28/14 – 10/04/14

October 3, 2014

President Obama has announced a new competition to award more than $200 million in public and private investment to create an Integrated Photonics Manufacturing Institute, led by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the second of four new institute competitions to be launched this year. AFOSR was instrumental in creating this opportunity by leading the way with innovative research funding in integrated photonics, participating in the National Academies Optics & Photonics study, participating in the OSTP Fast Track Action Committee on Optics & Photonics, and working with our DoD colleagues. AFOSR support for this award was managed by Gernot Pomrenke, Program Officer, Optoelectronics and Photonics.
FACT SHEET: President Obama Announces New Manufacturing Innovation Institute Competition
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/10/03/fact-sheet-president-obama-announces-new-manufacturing-innovation-instit

October 2, 2014

Innovation: Scintillating Statistics
A Look at High-Latitude and Equatorial Ionospheric Disturbances of GPS Signals The data collection and analysis project discussed in this article was supported by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research and Air Force Research Laboratory grants. http://gpsworld.com/innovation-scintillating-statistics/

October 1, 2014

All directions are not created equal for nanoscale heat sources
Thermal considerations are rapidly becoming one of the most serious design constraints in microelectronics, especially on submicron scale lengths. A study by researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has shown that standard thermal models will lead to the wrong answer in a three-dimensional heat-transfer problem if the dimensions of the heating element are on the order of one micron or smaller. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and was carried out, in part, at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory.
http://engineering.illinois.edu/news/article/9528

Platinum meets its match in quantum dots from coal
Graphene quantum dots created at Rice University grab onto graphene platelets like barnacles attach themselves to the hull of a boat. But these dots enhance the properties of the mothership, making them better than platinum catalysts for certain reactions within fuel cells. The Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and its MURI program supported the research.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/10/01/platinum-meets-its-match-in-quantum-dots-from-coal/

Head of Air Force lab at Wright-Patterson to give Rolls-Royce lecture
Air Force Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Masiello will give the 2014 Rolls-Royce Memorial Lecture at Purdue University on Oct. 8. Masiello is commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2014/Q4/head-of-air-force-lab-at-wright-patterson-to-give-rolls-royce-lecture.html

September 30, 2014

Causes of California drought linked to climate change, Stanford scientists say
In a new study, a team led by Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh used a novel combination of computer simulations and statistical techniques to show that a persistent region of high atmospheric pressure hovering over the Pacific Ocean that diverted storms away from California was much more likely to form in the presence of modern greenhouse gas concentrations. http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/september/drought-climate-change-092914.html

September 29, 2014

Adding natural uncertainty improves mathematical models
Mathematicians from Brown University have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world. The work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. https://news.brown.edu/articles/2014/09/burgers

A Week in Review: 9/7/14 – 9/13/14

Sept. 11, 2014

Morphing wing
Michigan Aerospace engineers are using new materials and techniques to allow airplane wings to flex and move more like bird wings. Instead of traditional flaps, they are designing wings that can morph based on an electrical inputs. These morphing wings are still in the developing stages but may open the doors to lighter weight aircraft that are more agile than traditional airplanes. http://www.engin.umich.edu/college/about/news/stories/2014/september/morphing-wing

Stanford engineers help describe key mechanism in energy and information storage
By observing how hydrogen is absorbed into individual palladium nanocubes, Stanford materials scientists have detailed a key step in storing energy and information in nanomaterials. The work could inform research that leads to longer-lasting batteries or higher-capacity memory devices. http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/september/battery-palladium-dionne-091114.html

Physicists find a new way to push electrons around
When moving through a conductive material in an electric field, electrons tend to follow the path of least resistance — which runs in the direction of that field. But now physicists at MIT and the University of Manchester have found an unexpectedly different behavior under very specialized conditions — one that might lead to new types of transistors and electronic circuits that could prove highly energy-efficient. http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/moving-electrons-on-graphene-0911

Researchers awarded for paper on low-cost algorithms for data storage systems  Research team that included Viveck Cadambe, assistant professor of electrical engineering, received a best paper award at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) International Symposium on Network Computing and Applications held Aug. 21-23 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. http://news.psu.edu/story/325874/2014/09/11/academics/researchers-awarded-paper-low-cost-algorithms-data-storage-systems

Sept. 9, 2014

Air Force Research Laboratory Partners With Doolittle Institute
The Air Force Research Laboratory at Eglin Air Force Base and the Doolittle Institute held a ribbon-cutting ceremony Monday to officially establish their partnership. The institute’s innovative research environment is focused on finding solutions to tough science and technology challenges in the community.
http://wuwf.org/post/air-force-research-laboratory-partners-doolittle-institute

A Week in Review: 1/5/14 – 1/11/14

January 7, 2014

New, Simple Technique May Drive Down Biofuel Production Costs
Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a simple, effective and relatively inexpensive technique for removing lignin from the plant material used to make biofuels, which may drive down the cost of biofuel production.
http://news.ncsu.edu/releases/wms-achinivu-2014/

With Laser-Doping, Silicon Responds to IR Light
New IR imaging systems could be possible now that a new method has demonstrated that silicon is more responsive to IR light when laser-doped with one of its most dangerous impurities: gold.
http://www.photonics.com/Article.aspx?AID=55668

January 8, 2014

Engineers make world’s fastest organic transistor, heralding
Teams from Stanford and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln collaborate to make thin, transparent semiconductors that could become the foundation for cheap, high-performance displays.
http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/engineers-make-world%E2%80%99s-fastest-organic-transistor-heralding-new-generation-see-through-electron

Two faculty receive Presidential Early Career Awards
Greg Fuchs, assistant professor of applied and engineering physics, and Noah Snavely, assistant professor of computer science, are among 102 winners this year of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on early career scientists and engineers.
http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2014/01/two-faculty-receive-presidential-early-career-awards

A Week in Review: 11/3/13 – 11/9/13

November 7, 2013

Carnegie Mellon Researchers Use Inkblots To Improve Security of Online Passwords
GOTCHA Scheme Could Foil Growing Problem of Automated Brute Force Attacks
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/news/carnegie-mellon-researchers-use-inkblots-improve-security-online-passwords

Snap to Attention: Pitt, Air Force researchers identify polymers that react and move to light
Microvehicles and other devices that can change shape or move with no power source other than a beam of light may be possible through research led by the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering. The researchers are investigating polymers that “snap” when triggered by light, thereby converting light energy into mechanical work and potentially eliminating the need for traditional machine components such as switches and power sources.
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/News.aspx?id=2147508987

November 8, 2013

Stanford researchers surprised to find how neural circuits zero in on the specific information needed for decisions
Using brain recordings and a computer model, an interdisciplinary team confounds the conventional wisdom about how the brain sorts out relevant versus irrelevant sensory inputs in making choices.
http://news.stanford.edu/news/2013/november/brain-cortex-decisions-110813.html