Week in Review: 12/7/14 – 12/13/14

December 11, 2014

Penn Research Outlines Basic Rules for Construction With a Type of Origami
A team of University of Pennsylvania researchers is turning kirigami, a related art form that allows the paper to be cut, into a technique that can be applied equally to structures on those vastly divergent length scales. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation through its ODISSEI program, the American Philosophical Society and the Simons Foundation.
http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/penn-research-outlines-basic-rules-construction-type-origami

December 10, 2014

Defects are perfect in laser-induced graphene
Researchers at Rice University have created flexible, patterned sheets of multilayer graphene from a cheap polymer by burning it with a computer-controlled laser. The process works in air at room temperature and eliminates the need for hot furnaces and controlled environments, and it makes graphene that may be suitable for electronics or energy storage.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/12/10/defects-are-perfect-in-laser-induced-graphene/

December 9, 2014

Local Scrabble player places second in world
A competitive Scrabble player who works at the Rome Air Force Research Laboratory, Lipe last month achieved what he called an “amazing experience,” finishing second at the world Scrabble Champions Tournament in London.
http://romesentinel.com/county/local-scrabble-player-places-second-in-world/QBqnlh!8bJmTlrrvCgSyy7qVVVG3Q/

Contact lens merges plastics and active electronics via 3-D printing
As part of a project demonstrating new 3-D printing techniques, Princeton researchers have embedded tiny light-emitting diodes into a standard contact lens, allowing the device to project beams of colored light.
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S41/81/41S44/index.xml

A Week in Review: 11/16/14 – 11/22/14

November 20, 2014

New semiconductor device could lead to better photodetectors
UCLA researchers have developed a perovskite photodetector that could reduce manufacturing costs and improve the quality of medical and commercial light sensors. http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/new-semiconductor-device-could-lead-to-better-photodectectors

November 18, 2014

Hu, Leite Named Outstanding Engineer and Scientist of the Year (VIDEO) University of Maryland assistant professors Liangbing Hu and Marina Leite were named Maryland Outstanding Young Engineer and Maryland Outstanding Young Scientist in the academic sector, respectively, by the Maryland Science Center. Both awards are sponsored by the Maryland Academy of Sciences. http://www.mse.umd.edu/news/news_story.php?id=8672

November 17, 2014

First Genetic-Based Tool to Detect Circulating Cancer Cells in Blood
Northwestern University scientists now have demonstrated a simple but powerful tool that can detect live cancer cells in the bloodstream, potentially long before the cells could settle somewhere in the body and form a dangerous tumor. http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2014/11/first-genetic-based-tool-to-detect-circulating-cancer-cells-in-blood.html

Researcher elected to Australian Academy of Science Council
A University of Queensland researcher’s respected career designing unmanned aerial vehicles based on biologically inspired systems has seen him elected onto the Australian Academy of Science Council. The Queensland Brain Institute’s Professor Mandyam Srinivasan is one of five new researchers elected to the council, which promotes scientific knowledge and advice. http://www.uq.edu.au/news/article/2014/11/researcher-elected-australian-academy-of-science-council

Graphene/nanotube hybrid benefits flexible solar cells
Rice University scientists have invented a novel cathode that may make cheap, flexible dye-sensitized solar cells practical.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/11/17/graphenenanotube-hybrid-benefits-flexible-solar-cells/

Fulbright award takes computer scientist to France
As one of this year’s Fulbright Scholars, ASU computer science professor Arunabha Sen will have an opportunity to work with some of Europe’s leading experts in his field to advance research on wireless sensor networks, robot networks and radio-frequency identification (RFID) devices.
https://asunews.asu.edu/20141113-arun-sen-fulbright-award

A Week in Review: 11/2/14 – 11/8/14

November 4, 2014

The First Fully 3-D Printed LEDs Are Here
McAlpine and his colleagues at Princeton University, however, have gone far beyond two-toned action figures. They mixed and matched five different materials into the first fully 3-D printed LED lights. Although other teams previously claimed the honor, McAlpine says those weren’t the real thing. “They print a breadboard of electronics, then plug regular LEDs into it.”
http://www.popsci.com/article/technology/first-fully-3-d-printed-leds-are-here

November 3, 2014

Rice chemists gain edge in next-gen energy
Rice University scientists who want to gain an edge in energy production and storage report they have found it in molybdenum disulfide. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour has turned molybdenum disulfide’s two-dimensional form into a nanoporous film that can catalyze the production of hydrogen or be used for energy storage. http://news.rice.edu/2014/11/03/rice-chemists-gain-edge-in-next-gen-energy-2/

A Week in Review: 7/20/14 – 7/26/14

July 24, 2014

Metal particles in solids aren’t as fixed as they seem, new memristor study shows In work that unmasks some of the magic behind memristors and “resistive random access memory,” or RRAM—cutting-edge computer components that combine logic and memory functions—researchers have shown that the metal particles in memristors don’t stay put as previously thought.
http://ns.umich.edu/new/releases/22257-metal-particles-in-solids-aren-t-as-fixed-as-they-seem-new-memristor-study-shows

July 22, 2014

Creating Optical Cables Out of Thin Air
Imagine being able to instantaneously run an optical cable or fiber to any point on earth, or even into space.  That’s what Howard Milchberg, professor of physics and electrical and computer engineering at the University of Maryland, wants to do. In a paper published in the July 2014 issue of the journal Optica, Milchberg and his lab report using an “air waveguide” to enhance light signals collected from distant sources.  These air waveguides could have many applications, including long-range laser communications, detecting pollution in the atmosphere, making high-resolution topographic maps and laser weapons.
http://umdrightnow.umd.edu/news/creating-optical-cables-out-thin-air

Birthday bash to celebrate laser inventor Charles Townes’ 99th
Only now nearing retirement – he plans to shutter his physics department office this summer, but will continue to make daily visits to his office at UC Berkeley’s Space Sciences Laboratory – Townes’ career highlights include a 1964 Nobel Prize in Physics for discovering the laser, ground-breaking astronomical research, wide-ranging admiration for his efforts to reconcile science and religion, 31 honorary degrees and 38 awards.
http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/birthday-bash-celebrate-laser-inventor-charles-townes%E2%80%99-99th

July 21, 2014

Carbyne Morphs when Stretched
Stretching the material known as carbyne — a hard-to-make, one-dimensional chain of carbon atoms — by just 3 percent can begin to change its properties in ways that engineers might find useful for mechanically activated nanoscale electronics and optics. The finding by Rice theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and his colleagues appears in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.
http://www.pddnet.com/news/2014/07/carbyne-morphs-when-stretched

Royal recognition for UQ researcher
Studies involving some of the world’s smallest creatures have resulted in one of the world’s biggest honours for University of Queensland researcher Professor Mandyam Srinivasan.
http://www.uq.edu.au/news/article/2014/07/royal-recognition-uq-researcher

July 20, 2014

Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity
A team of researchers led by Xiang Zhang, UC Berkeley professor of mechanical engineering, has found a way to dramatically increase the sensitivity of a light-based plasmon sensor to detect incredibly minute concentrations of explosives. The researchers noted that the sensor could potentially be used to sniff out a hard-to-detect explosive popular among terrorists.
http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2014/07/20/plasmon-laser-bomb-detection/

A Week in Review 6/8/14 – 6/14/14

June 12, 2014

When good people do bad things
Being in a group makes some people lose touch with their personal moral beliefs, researchers find. The research was funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Packard Foundation.
https://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/when-good-people-do-bad-things-0612

June 11, 2014

Suffocating cells for science
In May 2009, El-Naggar made a discovery, from which all of the experiments in his lab have since sprung: A few years earlier, a pair of scientists discovered that microbes grow long, hairy filaments or fibers that are electrically conductive. El-Naggar had a hypothesis. These fibers, he suspected, serve as a conductive bridge between the cell and the rock that they’re breathing. In other words, the path the electrons take to move from the cell body to material outside the cell. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/suffocating-cells-science/

Nanotube forests drink water from arid air
New research by scientists at Rice University demonstrated that forests of carbon nanotubes can be made to harvest water molecules from arid desert air and store them for future use. The U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative supported the research.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/06/11/nanotube-forests-drink-water-from-arid-air/

Self-Folding Printable Lamp
MIT, Harvard, and the University of Pennsylvania have been working on a project, developing soft robots with flexible, printed circuits. Last year a robot called the Crawling Inchworm was created that could be printed out flat, then fold itself into shape and move around with the help of a motor and power supply.
http://makerflux.com/self-folding-printable-lamp/

June 9, 2014

Designing Ion ‘Highway Systems’ for Batteries
A McCormick team advanced the understanding of plastics for battery application
http://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/news/articles/2014/06/designing-ion-highway-systems-for-batteries.html

June 8, 2014

Howard Schlossberg Retirement Symposium
Howard “Howie” R. Schlossberg, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research program officer for optical sciences, has made critical contributions to the field of optics and lasers throughout his eminent career. He has guided research in diverse areas, such as ultra-fast optoelectronic techniques, nonlinear optics, laser cooling, and medical laser treatments. Dr. Schlossberg is a Fellow of OSA, IEEE, and ASLMS.
http://www.cleoconference.org/home/program/special-symposia/howard-schlossberg-retirement-symposium/