Week in Review: 12/7/14 – 12/13/14

December 11, 2014

Penn Research Outlines Basic Rules for Construction With a Type of Origami
A team of University of Pennsylvania researchers is turning kirigami, a related art form that allows the paper to be cut, into a technique that can be applied equally to structures on those vastly divergent length scales. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation through its ODISSEI program, the American Philosophical Society and the Simons Foundation.
http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/penn-research-outlines-basic-rules-construction-type-origami

December 10, 2014

Defects are perfect in laser-induced graphene
Researchers at Rice University have created flexible, patterned sheets of multilayer graphene from a cheap polymer by burning it with a computer-controlled laser. The process works in air at room temperature and eliminates the need for hot furnaces and controlled environments, and it makes graphene that may be suitable for electronics or energy storage.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/12/10/defects-are-perfect-in-laser-induced-graphene/

December 9, 2014

Local Scrabble player places second in world
A competitive Scrabble player who works at the Rome Air Force Research Laboratory, Lipe last month achieved what he called an “amazing experience,” finishing second at the world Scrabble Champions Tournament in London.
http://romesentinel.com/county/local-scrabble-player-places-second-in-world/QBqnlh!8bJmTlrrvCgSyy7qVVVG3Q/

Contact lens merges plastics and active electronics via 3-D printing
As part of a project demonstrating new 3-D printing techniques, Princeton researchers have embedded tiny light-emitting diodes into a standard contact lens, allowing the device to project beams of colored light.
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S41/81/41S44/index.xml

A Week in Review: 11/2/14 – 11/8/14

November 4, 2014

The First Fully 3-D Printed LEDs Are Here
McAlpine and his colleagues at Princeton University, however, have gone far beyond two-toned action figures. They mixed and matched five different materials into the first fully 3-D printed LED lights. Although other teams previously claimed the honor, McAlpine says those weren’t the real thing. “They print a breadboard of electronics, then plug regular LEDs into it.”
http://www.popsci.com/article/technology/first-fully-3-d-printed-leds-are-here

November 3, 2014

Rice chemists gain edge in next-gen energy
Rice University scientists who want to gain an edge in energy production and storage report they have found it in molybdenum disulfide. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour has turned molybdenum disulfide’s two-dimensional form into a nanoporous film that can catalyze the production of hydrogen or be used for energy storage. http://news.rice.edu/2014/11/03/rice-chemists-gain-edge-in-next-gen-energy-2/

A Week in Review: 7/7/13 – 7/13/13

July 8, 2013

Not-weak knots bolster carbon fiber
Large flakes of graphene oxide are the essential ingredient in a new recipe for robust carbon fiber created at Rice University. The fiber spun at Rice is unique for the strength of its knots. Most fibers are most likely to snap under tension at the knot, but Rice’s fiber demonstrates what the researchers refer to as “100 percent knot efficiency,” where the fiber is as likely to break anywhere along its length as at the knot.
http://news.rice.edu/2013/07/08/not-weak-knots-bolster-carbon-fiber-2/

Humboldt-Laureate Prof. Federico Capasso as Guest Scientist at the Marx-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics
In July 2013, the physicist Federico Capasso will join the Marx Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) as a guest scientist. Prof. Capasso is the Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics and a Vinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow in Electrical Engineering at Harvard University (Cambridge, MA USA). In May 2013, he was honoured with a Humboldt Research Award. This award is granted by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation to outstanding foreign academics at the peak of their careers. Award winners are invited to spend a period of six to twelve months on academic collaboration with specialist colleagues in Germany.
http://www.mpq.mpg.de/cms/mpq/en/news/awards/13_07_08.html  

July 9, 2013

Air Force Fiscal Year 2014 Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) BAA posted on Grants.gov
The Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) supports young scientists and engineers in Air Force relevant disciplines and is designed to promote innovative research in fields such as: energy, power and propulsion, materials interactions in extreme environments, aero-structure interactions and control, hierarchical design and characterization of materials, space architecture and protection, thermal control, mathematical, information and computer sciences, biology, behavioral sciences, plasma and quantum physics, theoretical and experimental physics, microwave and photonic systems, information and signal process, and materials-processing techniques. The awards foster creative basic research, enhance early career development of outstanding young investigators, and increase opportunities to recognize Air Force mission and challenges in science and engineering.
http://go.usa.gov/j5dm

July 11, 2013

Imperfect graphene renders ‘electrical highways’
Just an atom thick, 200 times stronger than steel and near-perfect conductor, graphene’s future in electronics is all but certain. But to make this carbon supermaterial useful, it needs to be a semiconductor– a material than can switch between insulating and conducting states, which forms the basis for all electronics today. Combining experiment and theory, Cornell researchers have moved a step closer to making graphene a useful, controllable material. They showed that when grown in stacked layers, graphene produces some specific defects that influence its conductivity.
http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/07/imperfect-graphene-renders-electrical-highways

A sound idea: Innovative lens takes shape as commercial product
On a late night in February 2011, two Princeton University researchers packed a small object into a box and set it out for the morning mail. The engineers had spent four years developing a new type of microscope lens that focuses in response to sound waves. They were sending their innovation to their first customer.
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S37/17/38C24/index.xml

A Week in Review: 6/30/13 – 7/6/13

July 1, 2013

A look into Duke’s scientific research
Duke has made a name for itself in groundbreaking scientific research earning a Nobel prize, numerous grants and countless headlines. Through the practical application of technologies, researchers have been able to solve diverse sets of problems.
http://www.dukechronicle.com/articles/2013/07/01/look-dukes-scientific-research

July 1, 2013

Altitude Sickness May Hinder Ethnic Integration in the World’s Highest Places
Research from Princeton University published in the journal Applied Geography suggests that people native to low-lying areas can be naturally barred from regions such as the Tibetan Plateau, the Andes or the Himalayas by altitude sickness, which is caused by low oxygen concentration in the air and can be life-threatening. As a result, the homogeny of the local population can increase with elevation. In nations shared by people of high- and lowland extractions, this separation can potentially increase ethnic tension.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130701151830.htm

July 3, 2013

SRI Alumnus and World-Renowned Computing Pioneer Douglas Engelbart Passed Away July 2
Engelbart’s work is the very foundation of personal computing and the Internet. His vision was to solve humanity’s most important problems by using computers to improve communications and collaboration. He was world famous for his invention of the computer mouse and the origins of interactive computing.
http://www.sri.com/newsroom/press-releases/douglas-engelbart-passed-away-july-2-2013

 

 

A Week in Review: 4/28/13 – 5/4/13

April 30, 2013

UMD Robot Bird Takes Maneuverability to New Height
University of Maryland professors S. K. Gupta and Hugh Bruck and their students have developed and demonstrated a new robotic bird, “Robo Raven”, whose wings flap completely independently of each other, and also can be programmed to perform any desired motion, enabling the bird to perform aerobatic maneuvers. This is the first time a robotic bird with these capabilities has been built and successfully flown.
http://umdrightnow.umd.edu/news/umd-robot-bird-takes-maneuverability-new-height

May 1, 2013

Printable Functional ‘Bionic’ Ear Melds Electronics and Biology
Scientists at Princeton University used off-the-shelf printing tools to create a functional ear that can “hear” radio frequencies far beyond the range of normal human capacity. The researchers’ primary purpose was to explore an efficient and versatile means to merge electronics with tissue. The scientists used 3D printing of cells and nanoparticles followed by cell culture to combine a small coil antenna with cartilage, creating what they term a bionic ear. This research was supported by The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Grand Challenges Program at Princeton University.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130501193208.htm

May 2, 2013

Robotic insects make first controlled flight
In culmination of a decade’s work, RoboBees achieve vertical takeoff, hovering, and steering
The demonstration of the first controlled flight of an insect-sized robot is the culmination of more than a decade’s work, led by researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.
http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/110/

May 3, 2013

X-51A Waverider achieves breakthrough in final flight
The final flight of the X-51A Waverider test program has accomplished a breakthrough in the development of flight reaching Mach 5.1 over the Pacific Ocean May 1. The crusier achieved Mach 5.1 traveling 230 nautical miles in just over six minutes, making this test the longest air-breathing hypersonic flight ever.
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123346970