Week in Review: 12/21/14 – 12/27/14

December 23, 2014

Air Force, small business develop technologies that help electronics stay cool
The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and a small business partner are developing technologies that they expect will enable successful use of high-power processors that operate on satellites with funding from the Air Force Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123435244

December 22, 2014

That Old PlayStation Can Aid Science
This spring, Gaurav Khanna noticed that the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth physics department was more crowded than usual. Why, he wondered, were so many students suddenly so interested in science?http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/23/science/an-economical-way-to-save-progress.html?_r=1

Hands on: Crafting ultrathin color coatings
In Harvard’s high-tech cleanroom, applied physicists produce vivid optical effects—on paper | The Capasso group was supported in this research by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and Draper Laboratory. The Center for Nanoscale Systems is a member of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, supported by the National Science Foundation.
http://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2014/12/hands-on-crafting-ultrathin-color-coatings

A Week in Review: 11/30/14-12/6/14

December 2, 2014

Alloying tougher tungsten
New tungsten alloys being developed in the Schuh Group at MIT could potentially replace depleted uranium in armor-piercing projectiles. Fourth-year materials science and engineering graduate student Zachary C. Cordero is working on low-toxicity, high-strength, high-density material for replacing depleted uranium in structural military applications. Depleted uranium poses a potential health hazard to soldiers and civilians. http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/alloying-tougher-tungsten-zack-cordero-1202

A Week in Review: 9/28/14 – 10/04/14

October 3, 2014

President Obama has announced a new competition to award more than $200 million in public and private investment to create an Integrated Photonics Manufacturing Institute, led by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the second of four new institute competitions to be launched this year. AFOSR was instrumental in creating this opportunity by leading the way with innovative research funding in integrated photonics, participating in the National Academies Optics & Photonics study, participating in the OSTP Fast Track Action Committee on Optics & Photonics, and working with our DoD colleagues. AFOSR support for this award was managed by Gernot Pomrenke, Program Officer, Optoelectronics and Photonics.
FACT SHEET: President Obama Announces New Manufacturing Innovation Institute Competition
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/10/03/fact-sheet-president-obama-announces-new-manufacturing-innovation-instit

October 2, 2014

Innovation: Scintillating Statistics
A Look at High-Latitude and Equatorial Ionospheric Disturbances of GPS Signals The data collection and analysis project discussed in this article was supported by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research and Air Force Research Laboratory grants. http://gpsworld.com/innovation-scintillating-statistics/

October 1, 2014

All directions are not created equal for nanoscale heat sources
Thermal considerations are rapidly becoming one of the most serious design constraints in microelectronics, especially on submicron scale lengths. A study by researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has shown that standard thermal models will lead to the wrong answer in a three-dimensional heat-transfer problem if the dimensions of the heating element are on the order of one micron or smaller. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and was carried out, in part, at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory.
http://engineering.illinois.edu/news/article/9528

Platinum meets its match in quantum dots from coal
Graphene quantum dots created at Rice University grab onto graphene platelets like barnacles attach themselves to the hull of a boat. But these dots enhance the properties of the mothership, making them better than platinum catalysts for certain reactions within fuel cells. The Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and its MURI program supported the research.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/10/01/platinum-meets-its-match-in-quantum-dots-from-coal/

Head of Air Force lab at Wright-Patterson to give Rolls-Royce lecture
Air Force Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Masiello will give the 2014 Rolls-Royce Memorial Lecture at Purdue University on Oct. 8. Masiello is commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2014/Q4/head-of-air-force-lab-at-wright-patterson-to-give-rolls-royce-lecture.html

September 30, 2014

Causes of California drought linked to climate change, Stanford scientists say
In a new study, a team led by Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh used a novel combination of computer simulations and statistical techniques to show that a persistent region of high atmospheric pressure hovering over the Pacific Ocean that diverted storms away from California was much more likely to form in the presence of modern greenhouse gas concentrations. http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/september/drought-climate-change-092914.html

September 29, 2014

Adding natural uncertainty improves mathematical models
Mathematicians from Brown University have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world. The work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. https://news.brown.edu/articles/2014/09/burgers

A Week in Review: 4/21/13 – 4/27/13

April 22, 2013

Physicists Find Right (and Left) Solution for On-Chip Optics: Nanoscale Router Converts and Directs Optical Signals Efficiently
A Harvard-led team of researchers has created a new type of nanoscale device that converts an optical signal into waves that travel along a metal surface. Significantly, the device can recognize specific kinds of polarized light and accordingly send the signal in one direction or another.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130422143313.htm

April 24, 2013

Supertough, Strong Nanofibers Developed
University of Nebraska-Lincoln materials engineers have developed a structural nanofiber that is both strong and tough, a discovery that could transform everything from airplanes and bridges to body armor and bicycles. Their findings are featured on the cover of this week’s April issue of the American Chemical Society’s journal, ACS Nano. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and a U.S. Army Research Office Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative grant.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130424112307.htm

April 24, 2013

U.S.-Australia agreement promotes space situational awareness
A new agreement made between the United States and Australia represents the first in what U.S. Strategic Command’s commander hopes will be many that promote transparency in the space domain.
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123345762

 

 

A week in Review: 6/24/12 to 6/30/12

A quick recap of AFRL and AFOSR news mentions over the past week.

June 25, 2012
Squashed nanotubes may be ripe with new possibilities for scientists, according to a new study by Rice University.
Researchers at Rice’s Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology have come up with a set of facts and figures about carbon nanotubes that appear to collapse during the growth process; they found that these unique configurations have properties of both nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons.
http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=25679.php

June 26, 2012

Better surfaces could help dissipate heat
Heat transfer in everything from computer chips to powerplants could be improved through new analysis of surface textures.
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/better-heat-transfer-0626.html

June 27, 2012

WaveRider set for third hypersonic test-flight
Boeing expects to conduct the third flight of the X-51A WaveRider hypersonic technology demonstrator “imminently”, having spent the previous year investigating the source of an engine issue that caused the first two flights to be ended prematurely.
http://www.janes.com/products/janes/defence-security-report.aspx?ID=1065968970&channel=defence&subChannel=systems

June 28, 2012

First 3D nanoscale optical cavities from metamaterials hold promise for nanolasers, photonic communications
The world’s smallest three-dimensional optical cavities with the potential to generate the world’s most intense nanolaser beams have been created by a scientific team led by researchers with the DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley.
http://phys.org/news/2012-06-3d-nanoscale-optical-cavities-metamaterials.html

Research lab helps solve C-5 cracking issues
Newly developed structural technologies developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory have solved critical cracking issues with the C-5 cargo aircraft, thereby expanding the aircraft’s serviceability.
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123307617