A Week in Review 6/8/14 – 6/14/14

June 12, 2014

When good people do bad things
Being in a group makes some people lose touch with their personal moral beliefs, researchers find. The research was funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Packard Foundation.
https://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/when-good-people-do-bad-things-0612

June 11, 2014

Suffocating cells for science
In May 2009, El-Naggar made a discovery, from which all of the experiments in his lab have since sprung: A few years earlier, a pair of scientists discovered that microbes grow long, hairy filaments or fibers that are electrically conductive. El-Naggar had a hypothesis. These fibers, he suspected, serve as a conductive bridge between the cell and the rock that they’re breathing. In other words, the path the electrons take to move from the cell body to material outside the cell. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/suffocating-cells-science/

Nanotube forests drink water from arid air
New research by scientists at Rice University demonstrated that forests of carbon nanotubes can be made to harvest water molecules from arid desert air and store them for future use. The U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative supported the research.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/06/11/nanotube-forests-drink-water-from-arid-air/

Self-Folding Printable Lamp
MIT, Harvard, and the University of Pennsylvania have been working on a project, developing soft robots with flexible, printed circuits. Last year a robot called the Crawling Inchworm was created that could be printed out flat, then fold itself into shape and move around with the help of a motor and power supply.
http://makerflux.com/self-folding-printable-lamp/

June 9, 2014

Designing Ion ‘Highway Systems’ for Batteries
A McCormick team advanced the understanding of plastics for battery application
http://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/news/articles/2014/06/designing-ion-highway-systems-for-batteries.html

June 8, 2014

Howard Schlossberg Retirement Symposium
Howard “Howie” R. Schlossberg, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research program officer for optical sciences, has made critical contributions to the field of optics and lasers throughout his eminent career. He has guided research in diverse areas, such as ultra-fast optoelectronic techniques, nonlinear optics, laser cooling, and medical laser treatments. Dr. Schlossberg is a Fellow of OSA, IEEE, and ASLMS.
http://www.cleoconference.org/home/program/special-symposia/howard-schlossberg-retirement-symposium/

A Week in Review: 4/6/14 – 4/12/14

April 6, 2014

Self-Assembled Silver Superlattices Create Molecular Machines with Hydrogen-Bond “Hinges” and Moving “Gears”
A combined computational and experimental study of self-assembled silver-based structures known as superlattices has revealed an unusual and unexpected behavior: arrays of gear-like molecular-scale machines that rotate in unison when pressure is applied to them.
http://www.research.gatech.edu/news/self-assembled-silver-superlattices-create-molecular-machines-hydrogen-bond-%E2%80%9Chinges%E2%80%9D-and-moving

April 7, 2014

Computing’s invisible challenge
Northeastern University assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering Ningfang Mi recently learned she was one of 42 early-​​career researchers to win a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. She plans to use award to figure out a better way to manage the vast amount of information sharing that takes place online—and push that mas­sive technical challenge even further into the background for end users.
http://www.northeastern.edu/news/2014/04/computings-invisible-challenge/

Rebar technique strengthens case for graphene
Carbon nanotubes are reinforcing bars that make two-dimensional graphene much easier to handles in a new hybrid material grown by researchers at Rice University. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour set nanotubes into graphene in a way that not only mimics how steel rebar is used in concrete but also preserves and even improves the electrical and mechanical qualities of both.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/04/07/rebar-technique-strengthens-case-for-graphene/

April 9, 2014

New ‘switch’ could power quantum computing
Using a laser to place individual rubidium atoms near the surface of a lattice of light, scientists at MIT and Harvard University have developed a new method for connecting particles — one that could help in the development of powerful quantum computing systems.
http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/new-switch-could-power-quantum-computing-0409

April 10, 2014

Fruit flies, fighter jets use similar nimble tactics when under attack
Researchers at the University of Washington used an array of high-speed video cameras operating at 7,500 frames a second to capture the wing and body motion of flies after they encountered a looming image of an approaching predator.
http://www.washington.edu/news/2014/04/10/fruit-flies-fighter-jets-use-similar-nimble-tactics-when-under-attack/

April 11, 2014

Air Force R&D group experiments with Google Glass
The BATMAN researchers are experimenting with many probable battlefield scenarios, including how Google Glass could be used by ground forces to help aircraft acquire targets or how it could work as a communications device between combat controllers and overhead aircraft.
http://www.airforcetimes.com/article/20140411/NEWS04/304110040/Air-Force-R-D-group-experiments-Google-Glass

A Week in Review: 8/11/13 – 8/17/13

August 12, 2013

Building stronger multifunctional composites
Carbon nanotube deicing technologies developed at MIT could be in flight tests as early as next year
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2013/building-stronger-multifunctional-composites.html

August 13, 2013

Plastic Solar Cells’ New Design Promises Bright Future
Unprecedented fill factors of 80 percent come close to that of silicon solar cells
http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2013/08/plastic-solar-cells-new-design-promises-bright-future.html

Infrared technology
UD-led breakthrough may advance development of mid-infrared light sources, lasers
http://www.udel.edu/udaily/2014/aug/optoelectronics-081313.html

August 15, 2013

Rice technique expands options for molecular imaging
One-of-a-kind spectrometer reads vibrations between atoms to find structures of molecules
A Rice University laboratory has improved upon its ability to determine molecular structures in three dimensions in ways that challenge long-used standards.
http://news.rice.edu/2013/08/15/rice-technique-expands-options-for-molecular-imaging/

A Week in Review: 8/4/13 – 8/10/13

August 5, 2013

Air Force Supported Researchers Build All-Optical Switch and Transistor: The Path to All Optical Quantum Information Processing
The control of a single photon–the elementary quantum carrier of light and all forms of electromagnetic radiation–is seen as the Holy Grail of quantum computing.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123358534

The Molecular Scanner
Pitt invents the world’s smallest terahertz detector
http://www.news.pitt.edu/news/molecule-scanner

August 6, 2013

Altering organic molecules’ interaction with light
MIT Researchers discover a new platform that provides simple means to manipulate organic molecules’ emission, and may have important implications to organic light emitting devices and molecular biosensors
http://www.eurekaalert.org/pub_releases/2013-08/miot-aom080613.php

August 8, 2013

JILA researchers discover atomic clock can simulate quantum magnetism
Researchers at JILA have for the first time used an atomic clock as a quantum simulator, mimicking the behavior of a different, more complex quantum system
http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2013/08/08/jila-researchers-discover-atomic-clock-can-simulate-quantum-magnetism

 

A Week in Review: 6/16/13 – 6/22/13

June 18, 2013

AIAA To Live Stream Two Sessions From Its Fluid Dynamics Conference
Sessions Celebrate 60 Years of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, With Focus on Hypersonics, and Achievements in Fluid Dynamics Research and Technology
The first session, “Celebrating 60 Years of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR): Hypersonics into the 21st Century – Research Progress Since 2001 and Future Directions in Aerothermodynamics,” will be streamed from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. (PDT). The session will review the history and progress of hypersonic flight and its technologies, and will also look at the possible future of the enterprise. Topics include: “The AFOSR Hypersonic Strategy”; “Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Laminar-Turbulent Transition”; and “Progress and Future Prospects for Particle-Based Simulation of Hypersonic Flow.” Other technical issues relevant to advancing the art of hypersonic flight will be discussed as well. Presenters include: John D. Schmisseur, program manager, aerothermodynamics and turbulence, AFOSR; Datta V. Gaitonde, John Glenn Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University; Steven P. Schneider, professor, aeronautics and astronautics, Purdue University; Helen L. Reed, professor, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Texas A&M University; and Graham V. Candler, McKnight Presidential Professor, McKnight University Professor, and Russell J. Penrose Professor, aerospace engineering and mechanics, University of Minnesota.
http://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=18423

June 19, 2013

Researchers report first entanglement between light and an optical atomic coherence
Using clouds of ultra-cold atoms and a pair of lasers operating at optical wavelengths, researchers have reached a quantum network milestone: entangling light with an optical atomic coherence composed of interacting atoms in two different states. The development could help pave the way for functional, multi-node quantum networks.

The research, done at the Georgia Institute of Technology, used a new type of optical trap that simultaneously confined both ground-state and highly-excited (Rydberg) atoms of the element ribidium. The large size of the Rydberg atoms – which have a radius of about one micron instead of a usual sub-nanometer size – gives them exaggerated electromagnetic properties and allows them to interact strongly with one another.
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-06/giot-rrf061813.php

June 21, 2013

Ferroelectric-graphene-based system could lead to improved information processing
Researchers at MIT have proposed a new system that combines ferroelectric materials – the kind often used for data storage – with graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon known for its exceptional electronic and mechanical properties. The resulting hybrid technology could eventually lead to computer and data-storage chips that pack more components in a given area and are faster and less power-hungry.
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2013/ferroelectric-graphene-based-system-could-lead-to-improved-information-processing-0621.html