A Week in Review: 8/17/14 – 8/23/14

Aug. 21, 2014

JILA team finds first direct evidence of ‘spin symmetry’ in atoms
JILA physicists led by theorist Ana Maria Rey and experimentalist Jun Ye have observed the first direct evidence of symmetry in the magnetic properties—or nuclear “spins”—of atoms. The advance could spin off practical benefits such as the ability to simulate and better understand exotic materials exhibiting phenomena such as superconductivity (electrical flow without resistance) and colossal magneto-resistance (drastic change in electrical flow in the presence of a magnetic field). http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2014/08/21/jila-team-finds-first-direct-evidence-%E2%80%98spin-symmetry%E2%80%99-atoms

Aug. 18, 2014

Bacterial nanowires not what scientists thought they were
For the past 10 years, scientists have been fascinated by a type of “electric bacteria” that shoots out long tendrils like electric wires, using them to power themselves and transfer electricity to a variety of solid surfaces. A team led by scientists at USC has now turned the study of these bacterial nanowires on its head, discovering that the key features in question are not pili, as previously believed, but rather extensions of the bacteria’s outer membrane equipped with proteins that transfer electrons called “cytochromes.”
https://news.usc.edu/67254/bacterial-nanowires-not-what-scientists-thought-they-were/

A Week in Review: 3/2/14 – 3/8/14

March 3, 2014

World Leader in LCD Research Selected for National Award
A much-decorated UCF optics researcher who specializes in liquid crystal displays and is among the university’s top patent generators is being recognized again by the nation’s premier optics society. Shin-Tson Wu, Pegasus professor of optics, has been selected to receive the Esther Hoffman Beller Medal from The Optical Society (OSA) for his broad and significant impact to academia and industry in photonics education.
http://today.ucf.edu/world-leader-lcd-research-selected-national-award/

March 5, 2014

Dealing with Loss
There’s exciting news from JILA’s ultracold molecule collaboration. The Jin, Ye, Holland, and Rey groups have come up with new theory (verified by experiment) that explains the suppression of chemical reactions between potassium-rubidium (KRb) molecules in the KRb quantum simulator.
https://jila.colorado.edu/news-highlights/dealing-loss

March 6, 2014

Crystals Ripple in Response to Light
Light can trigger coordinated, wavelike motions of atoms in atom-thin layers of crystal, scientists have shown. The waves, called phonon polaritons, are far shorter than light waves and can be “tuned” to particular frequencies and amplitudes by varying the number of layers of crystal, they report in the early online edition of Science March 7.
http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/crystals_ripple_in_response_to_light

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend
University of California, Berkeley, physicist Dmitry Budker and his colleagues at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and UCLA have now shown that these diamond sensors can measure the tiny magnetic fields in high-temperature superconductors, providing a new tool to probe these much ballyhooed but poorly understood materials.
http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2014/03/06/colored-diamonds-are-a-superconductors-best-friend/

 

A Week in Review: 9/15/13 – 9/21/13

September 18, 2013

Beyond Quantum Simulation: JILA Physicists Create ‘Crystal’ of Spin-swapping Ultracold Gas Molecules
Physicists at JILA have created a crystal-like arrangement of ultra cold gas molecules that can swap quantum “spin” properties with nearby and distant partners. The novel structure might be used to simulate or invent new materials that derive exotic properties from quantum spin behavior, for electronics or other practical applications.
http://www.nist.gov/pml/div689/jila-091813.cfm

September 19, 2013

Air Force Support for a Metamaterial Future
Metamaterials have been in the news lately–and not only in technical journals. That is because the attributes of metamaterials are seemingly magical. When arranged just so, these extremely small manmade elements can alter the character of electromagnetic radiation in ways that no other material–either natural or manmade–can.
www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123363809

 

A Week in Review: 8/4/13 – 8/10/13

August 5, 2013

Air Force Supported Researchers Build All-Optical Switch and Transistor: The Path to All Optical Quantum Information Processing
The control of a single photon–the elementary quantum carrier of light and all forms of electromagnetic radiation–is seen as the Holy Grail of quantum computing.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123358534

The Molecular Scanner
Pitt invents the world’s smallest terahertz detector
http://www.news.pitt.edu/news/molecule-scanner

August 6, 2013

Altering organic molecules’ interaction with light
MIT Researchers discover a new platform that provides simple means to manipulate organic molecules’ emission, and may have important implications to organic light emitting devices and molecular biosensors
http://www.eurekaalert.org/pub_releases/2013-08/miot-aom080613.php

August 8, 2013

JILA researchers discover atomic clock can simulate quantum magnetism
Researchers at JILA have for the first time used an atomic clock as a quantum simulator, mimicking the behavior of a different, more complex quantum system
http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2013/08/08/jila-researchers-discover-atomic-clock-can-simulate-quantum-magnetism

 

A Week in Review: 2/5/12 to 2/11/12

A quick recap of AFRL and AFOSR news mentions over the past week.

February 7, 2012

Spry robot built to zip like a butterfly
High-speed video of butterflies’ agility in flight may help researchers build tiny robots that mimic the insects’ maneuvers.
http://www.futurity.org/science-technology/spry-robot-built-to-zip-like-the-butterfly/

JILA scientists confirm first ‘frequency comb’ to probe ultraviolet wavelengths
Physicists at JILA have created the first “frequency comb” in the extreme ultraviolet band of the spectrum, high-energy light less than 100 nanometers (nm) in wavelength. Laser-generated frequency combs are the most accurate method available for precisely measuring frequencies, or colors, of light.
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/JILA_scientists_confirm_first_frequency_comb_to_probe_ultraviolet_wavelengths_999.html

February 9, 2012

AFRL announces X-56A
The US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has unveiled a new unmanned test aircraft, the Lockheed Martin X-56A, designed to study active flutter suppression. Two examples of the aircraft will be built, along with four sets of wings – one rigid, to test initial aircraft handling, and three sets with increasing flexibility for flutter tests.
http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/afrl-announces-x-56a-367914/

February 10, 2012

Electronics – the future is flexible
Flexible, printed electronics will usher in the “Organic Age” predicted Dr. Jennifer Ricklin, chief technologist at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory and the opening speaker of the 2012 FlexTech Alliance Flexible Electronics & Displays Conference & Exhibition.
http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=24220.php