A Week in Review: 7/6/14 – 7/12/14

July 8, 2014

Researcher receives Young Investigator Award for wind tunnel research
Dr. Lian Duan, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology, has received a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to support his research on how noise affects wind tunnel testing of boundary-layer transition for high-speed, hypersonic flight.
http://news.mst.edu/2014/07/researcher-receives-young-investigator-award-for-wind-tunnel-research/

‘Metamirror’ Doubles Incident Light Frequency
A nanostructure produces nonlinear effects a million times greater than traditional, macroscale nonlinear crystals, according to a team of researchers from Texas and Germany. This “metamirror” could enable miniaturized laser systems and enhance chemical sensing, explosives detection and biomedical research. http://www.photonics.com/Article.aspx?AID=56424

July 6, 2014

New hypersonic research branch coming to AEDC
In light of the success of several joint projects, AFRL leadership has decided to extend the organization’s partnership with AEDC by establishing a new hypersonic research branch, to be known as the High Speed Experimentation Branch, at Arnold Air Force Base.
http://www.tullahomanews.com/?p=25103

A Week in Review: 2/9/14 – 2/15/14

February 12, 2014

Tunnel 9 engineers conduct boundary layer transition experiments at Mach 10
The Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC) Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9 is performing experiments on a large 7-degree cone test article at Mach 10 to improve the understanding of hypersonic boundary layer transition in testing and evaluation (T&E) facilities. The testing is made possible under the Test Resource Management Center (TRMC) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded Hypersonic Center of Testing Excellence (CoTE).
http://www.arnold.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123400059

A Week in Review: 4/28/13 – 5/4/13

April 30, 2013

UMD Robot Bird Takes Maneuverability to New Height
University of Maryland professors S. K. Gupta and Hugh Bruck and their students have developed and demonstrated a new robotic bird, “Robo Raven”, whose wings flap completely independently of each other, and also can be programmed to perform any desired motion, enabling the bird to perform aerobatic maneuvers. This is the first time a robotic bird with these capabilities has been built and successfully flown.
http://umdrightnow.umd.edu/news/umd-robot-bird-takes-maneuverability-new-height

May 1, 2013

Printable Functional ‘Bionic’ Ear Melds Electronics and Biology
Scientists at Princeton University used off-the-shelf printing tools to create a functional ear that can “hear” radio frequencies far beyond the range of normal human capacity. The researchers’ primary purpose was to explore an efficient and versatile means to merge electronics with tissue. The scientists used 3D printing of cells and nanoparticles followed by cell culture to combine a small coil antenna with cartilage, creating what they term a bionic ear. This research was supported by The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Grand Challenges Program at Princeton University.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130501193208.htm

May 2, 2013

Robotic insects make first controlled flight
In culmination of a decade’s work, RoboBees achieve vertical takeoff, hovering, and steering
The demonstration of the first controlled flight of an insect-sized robot is the culmination of more than a decade’s work, led by researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.
http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/110/

May 3, 2013

X-51A Waverider achieves breakthrough in final flight
The final flight of the X-51A Waverider test program has accomplished a breakthrough in the development of flight reaching Mach 5.1 over the Pacific Ocean May 1. The crusier achieved Mach 5.1 traveling 230 nautical miles in just over six minutes, making this test the longest air-breathing hypersonic flight ever.
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123346970

A week in Review: 6/24/12 to 6/30/12

A quick recap of AFRL and AFOSR news mentions over the past week.

June 25, 2012
Squashed nanotubes may be ripe with new possibilities for scientists, according to a new study by Rice University.
Researchers at Rice’s Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology have come up with a set of facts and figures about carbon nanotubes that appear to collapse during the growth process; they found that these unique configurations have properties of both nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons.
http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=25679.php

June 26, 2012

Better surfaces could help dissipate heat
Heat transfer in everything from computer chips to powerplants could be improved through new analysis of surface textures.
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/better-heat-transfer-0626.html

June 27, 2012

WaveRider set for third hypersonic test-flight
Boeing expects to conduct the third flight of the X-51A WaveRider hypersonic technology demonstrator “imminently”, having spent the previous year investigating the source of an engine issue that caused the first two flights to be ended prematurely.
http://www.janes.com/products/janes/defence-security-report.aspx?ID=1065968970&channel=defence&subChannel=systems

June 28, 2012

First 3D nanoscale optical cavities from metamaterials hold promise for nanolasers, photonic communications
The world’s smallest three-dimensional optical cavities with the potential to generate the world’s most intense nanolaser beams have been created by a scientific team led by researchers with the DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley.
http://phys.org/news/2012-06-3d-nanoscale-optical-cavities-metamaterials.html

Research lab helps solve C-5 cracking issues
Newly developed structural technologies developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory have solved critical cracking issues with the C-5 cargo aircraft, thereby expanding the aircraft’s serviceability.
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123307617