Week in Review: 7/31/16 – 8/6/16

8/4/2016

Harvard spinout Validere to commercialize ‘liquid fingerprinting’ technique
A new company will commercialize sensing technology invented at Harvard University that can perform instant, in-field characterization of the chemical make-up and material properties of unknown liquids.
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2016/08/harvard-spinout-validere-to-commercialize-liquid-fingerprinting-technique

 

A Week in Review: 8/3/14 – 8/9/14

Aug. 8, 2014

Low-cost printable photonic integrated devices
By directly printing devices onto a functional resist with a high refractive index, optical components can be created without the use of any etching steps. This new low-cost fabrication technique can produce printable integrated circuits, as reported by researchers at aBeam Technologies, the Molecular Foundry and NanoOptic Devices. Presenting in Nanotechnology, several optical components are demonstrated, including ridge waveguides, light splitters and digital planar holograms that operate in the visible wavelength range. The approach could revolutionize the development of integrated photonic devices.
http://nanotechweb.org/cws/article/lab/58162

Aug. 7, 2014

Origami Robot Can Self-Assemble and Walk Without Human Help
A research team at Harvard and MIT announced today that they’ve created a self-assembling robot. The machine, which begins as a flat sheet of material, exploits principles of origami to fold itself into a 3-D robot capable of walking without any human assistance.
http://www.newsweek.com/origami-robot-can-self-assemble-and-walk-without-human-help-263381

A Week in Review: 1/26/14 – 2/1/14

January 28, 2014

“Chameleon of the sea” reveals its secrets
Scientists at Harvard University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) hope new understanding of the natural nanoscale photonic device that enables a small marine animal to dynamically change its colors will inspire improved protective camouflage for soldiers on the battlefield.
http://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2014/01/chameleon-of-sea-reveals-its-secrets? 

 

A Week in Review: 7/28/13 – 8/3/13

July 29, 2013

Pitt team finds water ‘likeability’ plays a role in battery-charged objects
http://www.news.pitt.edu/news/water-batteries

Water clears path for nanoribbon development
Rice University researchers create sub-10-nanomater graphene nanoribbon patterns
http://news.rice.edu/2013/07/29/water-clears-path-for-nanoribbon-development-2/

July 30, 2013

Origami unfolds a new tissue engineering strategy
Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, has been around for more than a millennium, but associate professor of mechanical and industrial engineering Carol Livermore is now using it to create solutions in an emerging multidisciplinary field in medicine: tissue engineering.
http://www.northeastern.edu/news/2013/07/origami-unfolds-a-new-tissue-engineering-strategy/

August 2, 2013

New coating turns ordinary glass into superglass
A new transparent, bioinspired coating makes ordinary glass tough, self-cleaning, and incredibly slippery, a team from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) reported online in the July 31 edition of Nature Communication.
http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/120

 

A Week in Review: 4/28/13 – 5/4/13

April 30, 2013

UMD Robot Bird Takes Maneuverability to New Height
University of Maryland professors S. K. Gupta and Hugh Bruck and their students have developed and demonstrated a new robotic bird, “Robo Raven”, whose wings flap completely independently of each other, and also can be programmed to perform any desired motion, enabling the bird to perform aerobatic maneuvers. This is the first time a robotic bird with these capabilities has been built and successfully flown.
http://umdrightnow.umd.edu/news/umd-robot-bird-takes-maneuverability-new-height

May 1, 2013

Printable Functional ‘Bionic’ Ear Melds Electronics and Biology
Scientists at Princeton University used off-the-shelf printing tools to create a functional ear that can “hear” radio frequencies far beyond the range of normal human capacity. The researchers’ primary purpose was to explore an efficient and versatile means to merge electronics with tissue. The scientists used 3D printing of cells and nanoparticles followed by cell culture to combine a small coil antenna with cartilage, creating what they term a bionic ear. This research was supported by The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Grand Challenges Program at Princeton University.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130501193208.htm

May 2, 2013

Robotic insects make first controlled flight
In culmination of a decade’s work, RoboBees achieve vertical takeoff, hovering, and steering
The demonstration of the first controlled flight of an insect-sized robot is the culmination of more than a decade’s work, led by researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.
http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/110/

May 3, 2013

X-51A Waverider achieves breakthrough in final flight
The final flight of the X-51A Waverider test program has accomplished a breakthrough in the development of flight reaching Mach 5.1 over the Pacific Ocean May 1. The crusier achieved Mach 5.1 traveling 230 nautical miles in just over six minutes, making this test the longest air-breathing hypersonic flight ever.
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123346970