A Week in Review: 6/15/14 – 6/21/14

June 19, 2014

Cybersecurity center earns DHS, NSA designation
Kansas State University’s cybersecurity center is receiving national recognition for its dedication to cutting-edge research. The university’s Center for Information and Systems Assurance has been redesignated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cyber Defense Research. The designation is from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the National Security Agency and is effective from 2014 to 2019.
http://www.k-state.edu/media/newsreleases/jun14/cybersecurity61914.html

June 17, 2014

Displaying content by popularity encourages ‘irrational herding,’ study finds
To explore user experience, a recent study determined what kind of content users prefer and then evaluated how position on a webpage affects collective judgments about content. Published in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE, study co-authors Kristina Lerman, a computer science professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and a project leader at USC Viterbi’s Information Sciences Institute, and Tad Hogg, a research fellow at the Institute for Molecular Manufacturing in Palo Alto, California, evaluated some popular peer recommendation strategies and their ability to identify interesting content.
http://news.usc.edu/64309/displaying-content-by-popularity-encourages-irrational-herding-social-media-study-says/

June 16, 2014

New Insight Into How Bats Conquer the Air
Now, in experiments at Brown University with Jamaican fruit bats, Jorn Cheney, a graduate student in ecology and evolutionary biology, and others, including Kenny Breuer and Sharon Swartz, have found signs that the muscles do indeed contract on the downstroke when bats are flying.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/16/science/new-insight-into-how-bats-conquer-the-air.html?_r=2

A Week in Review: 06/03/12 to 6/09/12

A quick recap of AFRL and AFOSR news mentions over the past week.

June 4, 2012

Physicists store short movies in an atomic vapor
The storage of light-encoded messages on film and compact disks and as holograms is ubiquitous—grocery scanners, Netflix disks, credit-card images are just a few examples. And now light signals can be stored as patterns in a room-temperature vapor of atoms.
http://phys.org/news/2012-05-physicists-short-movies-atomic-vapor.html

Ascending Aggies win design competition with superhero device
A team of engineering students at Utah State University designed what could be the next high-tech device for military special forces.
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865556743/Ascending-Aggies-win-design-competition-with-superhero-device.html

June 5, 2012

Energy-dense Biofuel from Cellulose Close to Being Economical
A new Purdue University-developed process for creating biofuels has shown potential to be cost-effective for production scale, opening the door for moving beyond the laboratory setting.
http://www.imperialvalleynews.com/index.php/news/latest-news/705-energy-dense-biofuel-from-cellulose-close-to-being-economical

June 7, 2012

Emerging Optics Technology to Fly on Microsatellite: Photon Sieve Demonstrated for First Time in Ground Experiment
A kitchen gadget used to sift flour and other ingredients is the inspiration behind the name of an emerging technology that could resolve some of the more intriguing components of the sun’s chromosphere — the irregular layer above the photosphere that contributes to the formation of solar flares and coronal mass ejections.
http://www.nasa.gov/topics/technology/features/kitchen-optics.html

AFRL seeks computer network that morph under attack
The Air Force Research Laboratory wants to build a “rapidly-shifting” computer network infrastructure that morphs when under attack and confuses those trying to target it, government documents show.
http://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2012/06/air-force-seeks-computer-networks-morph-under-attack/56052/?oref=ng-Hpriver

Save Rome Lab: As cyberwarfare escalates, so must cybersecurity
The “next Pearl Harbor we confront could very well be a cyberattack that cripples our power systems, our grid, our security systems, our financial systems,” Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned last year.
http://blog.syracuse.com/opinion/2012/06/save_rome_lab_as_cyberwarfare.html

June 8, 2012

Armored caterpillar could inspire new body armor
Military body armor and vehicle and aircraft frames could be transformed by incorporating the unique structure of the club-like arm of a crustacean that looks like an armored caterpillar, according to findings by a team of researchers at the University of California.
http://www.sciencecodex.com/armored_caterpillar_could_inspire_new_body_armor-92920

A Week in Review: 05/06/12 to 5/12/12

A quick recap of AFRL and AFOSR news mentions over the past week.

May 10, 2012

HIFiRE Scramjet Research Flight Will Advance Hypersonic Technology
An international team that includes NASA and the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is celebrating the successful launch of an experimental hypersonic scramjet research flight from the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Hawaii.
http://www.avionics-intelligence.com/news/2012/05/09/hifire-scramjet-research-flight-will-advance-hypersonic-technology.html

May 11, 2012

Cybersecurity experts begin investigation on self-adapting computer network
In the online struggle for network security, Kansas State University cybersecurity experts are adding an ally to the security force: the computer network itself.
http://www.rdmag.com/News/2012/05/Information-Technology-Cybersecurity-Experts-Investigate-Self-Adapting-Computer-Network/

Test Pilot School teaches students to fly, fight, win in cyberspace
“We are the place where the world comes to learn about test and evaluation. With the introduction of the Cyber Systems Test Course, we can now teach our graduates and others the framework for testing cyber systems in a contested environment,” said Col. Noel Zamot, TPS commandant. “This is the first course of its kind that includes a disciplined, yet flexible approach to testing cyber intensive systems.”
http://www.afmc.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123301314

Nanotube ‘sponge’ has potential in oil spill cleanup
Carbon nanotubes, which consist of atom-thick sheets of carbon rolled into cylinders, have captured scientific attention in recent decades because of their high strength, potential high conductivity and light weight. But producing nanotubes in bulk for specialized applications was often limited by difficulties in controlling the growth process as well as dispersing and sorting the produced nanotubes.
http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=45121