A Week in Review 6/8/14 – 6/14/14

June 12, 2014

When good people do bad things
Being in a group makes some people lose touch with their personal moral beliefs, researchers find. The research was funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Packard Foundation.
https://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/when-good-people-do-bad-things-0612

June 11, 2014

Suffocating cells for science
In May 2009, El-Naggar made a discovery, from which all of the experiments in his lab have since sprung: A few years earlier, a pair of scientists discovered that microbes grow long, hairy filaments or fibers that are electrically conductive. El-Naggar had a hypothesis. These fibers, he suspected, serve as a conductive bridge between the cell and the rock that they’re breathing. In other words, the path the electrons take to move from the cell body to material outside the cell. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/suffocating-cells-science/

Nanotube forests drink water from arid air
New research by scientists at Rice University demonstrated that forests of carbon nanotubes can be made to harvest water molecules from arid desert air and store them for future use. The U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative supported the research.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/06/11/nanotube-forests-drink-water-from-arid-air/

Self-Folding Printable Lamp
MIT, Harvard, and the University of Pennsylvania have been working on a project, developing soft robots with flexible, printed circuits. Last year a robot called the Crawling Inchworm was created that could be printed out flat, then fold itself into shape and move around with the help of a motor and power supply.
http://makerflux.com/self-folding-printable-lamp/

June 9, 2014

Designing Ion ‘Highway Systems’ for Batteries
A McCormick team advanced the understanding of plastics for battery application
http://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/news/articles/2014/06/designing-ion-highway-systems-for-batteries.html

June 8, 2014

Howard Schlossberg Retirement Symposium
Howard “Howie” R. Schlossberg, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research program officer for optical sciences, has made critical contributions to the field of optics and lasers throughout his eminent career. He has guided research in diverse areas, such as ultra-fast optoelectronic techniques, nonlinear optics, laser cooling, and medical laser treatments. Dr. Schlossberg is a Fellow of OSA, IEEE, and ASLMS.
http://www.cleoconference.org/home/program/special-symposia/howard-schlossberg-retirement-symposium/

A Week in Review: 6/9/13 – 6/15/13

June 10, 2013

Retinal illumination to protect against laser damage

Human retinal pigmented epithelium cells in culture are more resistant to a lethal pulse of laser radiation if they are first exposed to low levels of red light.
http://spie.org/x94056.xml?highlight=x2416&ArticleID=x94056

June 11, 2013

Polymer Structures Serve as “Nanoreactors” for Nanocrystals with Uniform Sizes and Shapes

Using star-shaped block co-polymer structures as tiny reaction vessels, researchers have developed an improved technique for producing nanocrystals with consistent sizes, compositions and architectures — including metallic, ferroelectric, magnetic, semiconductor and luminescent nanocrystals. The technique relies on the length of polymer molecules and the ratio of two solvents to control the size and uniformity of colloidal nanocrystals.
http://www.gatech.edu/research/news/polymer-structures-serve-%E2%80%9Cnanoreactors%E2%80%9D-nanocrystals-uniform-sizes-and-shapes

June 13, 2013

Unzipped nanotubes unlock potential for batteries

Researchers at Rice University have come up with a new way to boost the efficiency of the ubiquitous lithium ion (LI) battery by employing ribbons of graphene that start as carbon nanotubes.
http://news.rice.edu/2013/06/13/unzipped-nanotubes-unlock-potential-for-batteries-2/

June 13, 2013

Air Force Announces Basic Research Awards

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research granted seven awards to various academic institutions to perform multidisciplinary basic research. The AFOSR awards, totaling $67.5 million, are the result of the Fiscal Year 2013 competition conducted by AFOSR, the Army Research Office, and the Office of Naval Research under the Department of Defense (DoD) Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) Program.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123352368

 

A Week in Review: 4/14/13 – 4/20/13

4/15/2013

Dr. Partick G. Carrick, a member of the Senior Executive Service, is Acting Director and Director, Basic Science Office, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)
In March, Dr. Pat Carrick, SES, replaced Dr. Russell as (Acting) Director of AFOSR. In his new role, Dr. Carrick guides the management of the entire basic research investment for the United States Air Force. Dr. Carrick leads a staff of 200 scientists, engineers and administrators in Arlington, VA and foreign technology offices in London, Tokyo and Santiago, Chile. Each year, AFOSR selects sponsors and manages revolutionary basic research that impacts the future Air Force.
http://www.af.mil/information/bios/bio.asp?bioID=9852

4/15/2013

Cleaner fuel in the works for military jets
Alternative fuel is playing an even bigger role in the U.S. government’s aviation plan. Within the next year the latest National Aeronautics Research and Development Plan will be released and a large portion of it focuses on alternative fuels. Wright Patterson Air Force Base is playing a leading role, in part because it can moderately scale up lab production for commercial companies. WVXU’s Ann Thompson took a tour to see how it’s made, where it’s tested and what unusual samples the Air Force is storing. She reports in “Focus on Technology.”
http://www.wvxu.org/post/cleaner-fuel-works-military-jets

4/16/2013

Small in Size, Big On Power: New Microbatteries the Most Powerful Yet
Though they may be little, they are fierce. The most powerful batteries on the planet are only a few millimeters in size, yet they pack such a punch that a driver could use a cellphone powered by these batteries to jump-start a dead car battery — and then recharge the phone in the blink of an eye.
The National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research supported this work.
http://sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130416151929.htm