A Week in Review: 8/10/14 – 8/16/14

Aug. 12, 2014

Electrical engineering’s Giebink receives Air Force Young Investigator Award Giebink’s proposal, titled “Complex index and nonlinearity modulation in organic photonic composites,” aims to develop a new class of optical materials made from small molecules and polymers that control the flow of light in photonic integrated circuits to enable unidirectional properties and efficient frequency conversion. http://news.psu.edu/story/322647/2014/08/12/academics/electrical-engineerings-giebink-receives-air-force-young

Aug. 13, 2014

New material could enhance fast and accurate DNA sequencing
Now, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that nanopores in the material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could sequence DNA more accurately, quickly and inexpensively than anything yet available. http://news.illinois.edu/news/14/0813nanopores_NarayanaAluru.html

Focus on the Future

History has demonstrated that basic science is often unpredictable. When managed successfully it produces groundbreaking and game changing technologies for the Department of Defense, the U.S. Air Force and society as a whole. The United States depends on science, technology and innovative engineering to protect the American people and advance our national interests.

In this video, we focus on AFOSR’s investment in the six basic research areas that have the potential to create foundations for new disruptive technologies and solve formerly unsolvable problems for the Department of Defense. These areas are organized and managed in five scientific directorates: Dynamical Systems and Control (RTA), Quantum & Non-Equilibrium Processes (RTB), Information, Decision, and Complex Networks (RTC), Complex materials and Devices (RTD), and Energy, Power, and Propulsion (RTE). The research activities managed within each directorate are summarized on our website.

Dr. Russell, the former director of AFOSR (current Director of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory) highlights AFOSR’s focus to identify cutting edge scientific principles that will lead to a future Air Force unlike the one we have today.

The focus of AFOSR is on research areas that offer significant and comprehensive benefits to our national warfighting and peacekeeping capabilities. The ground breaking work of our scientists and engineers will yield significant results well into the future!

What disruptive technology do you envision in the future?

A Week in Review: 4/6/14 – 4/12/14

April 6, 2014

Self-Assembled Silver Superlattices Create Molecular Machines with Hydrogen-Bond “Hinges” and Moving “Gears”
A combined computational and experimental study of self-assembled silver-based structures known as superlattices has revealed an unusual and unexpected behavior: arrays of gear-like molecular-scale machines that rotate in unison when pressure is applied to them.
http://www.research.gatech.edu/news/self-assembled-silver-superlattices-create-molecular-machines-hydrogen-bond-%E2%80%9Chinges%E2%80%9D-and-moving

April 7, 2014

Computing’s invisible challenge
Northeastern University assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering Ningfang Mi recently learned she was one of 42 early-​​career researchers to win a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. She plans to use award to figure out a better way to manage the vast amount of information sharing that takes place online—and push that mas­sive technical challenge even further into the background for end users.
http://www.northeastern.edu/news/2014/04/computings-invisible-challenge/

Rebar technique strengthens case for graphene
Carbon nanotubes are reinforcing bars that make two-dimensional graphene much easier to handles in a new hybrid material grown by researchers at Rice University. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour set nanotubes into graphene in a way that not only mimics how steel rebar is used in concrete but also preserves and even improves the electrical and mechanical qualities of both.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/04/07/rebar-technique-strengthens-case-for-graphene/

April 9, 2014

New ‘switch’ could power quantum computing
Using a laser to place individual rubidium atoms near the surface of a lattice of light, scientists at MIT and Harvard University have developed a new method for connecting particles — one that could help in the development of powerful quantum computing systems.
http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/new-switch-could-power-quantum-computing-0409

April 10, 2014

Fruit flies, fighter jets use similar nimble tactics when under attack
Researchers at the University of Washington used an array of high-speed video cameras operating at 7,500 frames a second to capture the wing and body motion of flies after they encountered a looming image of an approaching predator.
http://www.washington.edu/news/2014/04/10/fruit-flies-fighter-jets-use-similar-nimble-tactics-when-under-attack/

April 11, 2014

Air Force R&D group experiments with Google Glass
The BATMAN researchers are experimenting with many probable battlefield scenarios, including how Google Glass could be used by ground forces to help aircraft acquire targets or how it could work as a communications device between combat controllers and overhead aircraft.
http://www.airforcetimes.com/article/20140411/NEWS04/304110040/Air-Force-R-D-group-experiments-Google-Glass

A Week in Review: 3/23/14 – 3/29/14

March 24, 2014

Air Force Office of Scientific Research selects materials researchers for Star Team Awards
Three research groups, under the leadership of Air Force Research Laboratory Materials and Manufacturing Directorate scientists were named Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Star Teams for 2014. The Star Team Award emphasizes and recognizes excellence in basic research performed within AFRL’s technology directorates. The designation is limited to no more than 10 percent of AFRL’s intramural basic research activities, and it acknowledges researchers who have demonstrated world class scientific or engineering achievement that is cutting edge, and “the best of the best.”
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123404659

March 25, 2014

When hummingbirds fly unfriendly skies
The first measurements of how much a flying animal’s metabolism revs up when coping with turbulent air come from five Anna’s hummingbirds (Calypte anna) that Victor M. Ortega-Jimenez of the University of California, Berkeley and his colleagues tested.
https://www.sciencenews.org/article/when-hummingbirds-fly-unfriendly-skies

March 26, 2014

UTEP Professor Receives Grant from Air Force Office of Scientific Research
Assistant Professor of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering David Roberson, Ph.D., has been awarded a Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Roberson the first UTEP faculty member or researcher to receive this particular grant.
http://engineering.utep.edu/announcement032614.htm

March 27, 2014

Cadet wins American Chemical Society award for polymer research
A senior cadet here won an award for the best undergraduate research poster from the American Chemical Society’s Division of Polymer Chemistry during the Society’s national meeting in Dallas March 16-20.
http://www.usafa.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123405134

March 29, 2014

The Artificial Leaf Is Here. Again.
General Electric is promoting a feel-good collection of videos these days. Called “Focus Forward,” it promises “short films, big ideas.” Each of these mini-docs triumphantly chronicles an innovative idea, like Daniel Nocera’s. This Harvard chemist has pioneered the artificial leaf, an invention that generates energy more or less the way a tree does. Light strikes a container of water and out bubbles hydrogen, an energy source.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/30/technology/the-artificial-leaf-is-here-again.html?_r=1

A Week in Review: 3/2/14 – 3/8/14

March 3, 2014

World Leader in LCD Research Selected for National Award
A much-decorated UCF optics researcher who specializes in liquid crystal displays and is among the university’s top patent generators is being recognized again by the nation’s premier optics society. Shin-Tson Wu, Pegasus professor of optics, has been selected to receive the Esther Hoffman Beller Medal from The Optical Society (OSA) for his broad and significant impact to academia and industry in photonics education.
http://today.ucf.edu/world-leader-lcd-research-selected-national-award/

March 5, 2014

Dealing with Loss
There’s exciting news from JILA’s ultracold molecule collaboration. The Jin, Ye, Holland, and Rey groups have come up with new theory (verified by experiment) that explains the suppression of chemical reactions between potassium-rubidium (KRb) molecules in the KRb quantum simulator.
https://jila.colorado.edu/news-highlights/dealing-loss

March 6, 2014

Crystals Ripple in Response to Light
Light can trigger coordinated, wavelike motions of atoms in atom-thin layers of crystal, scientists have shown. The waves, called phonon polaritons, are far shorter than light waves and can be “tuned” to particular frequencies and amplitudes by varying the number of layers of crystal, they report in the early online edition of Science March 7.
http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/crystals_ripple_in_response_to_light

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend
University of California, Berkeley, physicist Dmitry Budker and his colleagues at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and UCLA have now shown that these diamond sensors can measure the tiny magnetic fields in high-temperature superconductors, providing a new tool to probe these much ballyhooed but poorly understood materials.
http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2014/03/06/colored-diamonds-are-a-superconductors-best-friend/