Week in Review: 12/14/14 – 12/20/14

December 17, 2014

8 Scientists Who Are Changing The World
John Rogers, scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign:
Dissolvable electronic materials – that’s what this American engineer is trying to perfect, in a bid to create materials that could be integrated into biological organisms (i.e. humans) with minimal problems. The potential is huge – environmentally-friendly gadgets that protect the planet by degrading naturally and bio-medical instruments which can be used in advanced surgery or within human patients.
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/8-scientists-who-are-changing-the-world-073052289.html#VXglRQh

Week in Review: 12/7/14 – 12/13/14

December 11, 2014

Penn Research Outlines Basic Rules for Construction With a Type of Origami
A team of University of Pennsylvania researchers is turning kirigami, a related art form that allows the paper to be cut, into a technique that can be applied equally to structures on those vastly divergent length scales. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation through its ODISSEI program, the American Philosophical Society and the Simons Foundation.
http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/penn-research-outlines-basic-rules-construction-type-origami

December 10, 2014

Defects are perfect in laser-induced graphene
Researchers at Rice University have created flexible, patterned sheets of multilayer graphene from a cheap polymer by burning it with a computer-controlled laser. The process works in air at room temperature and eliminates the need for hot furnaces and controlled environments, and it makes graphene that may be suitable for electronics or energy storage.
http://news.rice.edu/2014/12/10/defects-are-perfect-in-laser-induced-graphene/

December 9, 2014

Local Scrabble player places second in world
A competitive Scrabble player who works at the Rome Air Force Research Laboratory, Lipe last month achieved what he called an “amazing experience,” finishing second at the world Scrabble Champions Tournament in London.
http://romesentinel.com/county/local-scrabble-player-places-second-in-world/QBqnlh!8bJmTlrrvCgSyy7qVVVG3Q/

Contact lens merges plastics and active electronics via 3-D printing
As part of a project demonstrating new 3-D printing techniques, Princeton researchers have embedded tiny light-emitting diodes into a standard contact lens, allowing the device to project beams of colored light.
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S41/81/41S44/index.xml

A Week in Review: 11/30/14-12/6/14

December 2, 2014

Alloying tougher tungsten
New tungsten alloys being developed in the Schuh Group at MIT could potentially replace depleted uranium in armor-piercing projectiles. Fourth-year materials science and engineering graduate student Zachary C. Cordero is working on low-toxicity, high-strength, high-density material for replacing depleted uranium in structural military applications. Depleted uranium poses a potential health hazard to soldiers and civilians. http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/alloying-tougher-tungsten-zack-cordero-1202

A Week in Review: 11/23/14-11/29/14

November 26, 2014

University of Minnesota engineers make sound loud enough to bend light on a computer chip
University of Minnesota engineering researchers have developed a chip on which both sound wave and light wave are generated and confined together so that the sound can very efficiently control the light. The novel device platform could improve wireless communications systems using optical fibers and ultimately be used for computation using quantum physics.
http://discover.umn.edu/news/science-technology/university-minnesota-engineers-make-sound-loud-enough-bend-light-computer

November 24, 2014

New device could make large biological circuits practical
A team of researchers at MIT has now come up with a way of greatly reducing that unpredictability, introducing a device that could ultimately allow such circuits to behave nearly as predictably as their electronic counterparts. The findings are published this week in the journal Nature Biotechnology, in a paper by associate professor of mechanical engineering Domitilla Del Vecchio and professor of biological engineering Ron Weiss.
http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/predictable-biological-circuits-1124

 

A Week in Review: 10/26/14 – 11/1/14

October 30, 2014

AFOSR continues legacy of Nobel Prize-winning research
The Air Force Office of Scientific Research will add four winners to its illustrious list following the Nobel Foundation’s announcements of the 2014 laureates for Physics and Chemistry on Oct. 7 and 8.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123429966

October 28, 2014

Air Force takes table-top approach to quantum physics
Air Force Research Laboratory scientists can now study the mysteries of quantum physics in house and at a lower cost, thanks to a new high performance table-top quantum computing system. With funding in part from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program, cold-atom technology developer, ColdQuanta, delivered two table-top Bose Einstein Condensate (BEC) systems–one in April 2014 and the second in September 2014–to a new facility jointly operated by AFRL and the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123429620