A Week in Review: 10/5/14 – 10/11/14

October 9, 2014

Electrically conductive plastics promising for batteries, solar cells
An emerging class of electrically conductive plastics called “radical polymers” may bring low-cost, transparent solar cells, flexible and lightweight batteries, and ultrathin antistatic coatings for consumer electronics and aircraft. Researchers have established the solid-state electrical properties of one such polymer, called PTMA, which is about 10 times more electrically conductive than common semiconducting polymers. http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2014/Q4/electrically-conductive-plastics-promising-for-batteries,-solar-cells.html

October 7, 2014

Hackathon challenges abilities to solve real-world AFRL problems
Air Force Research Laboratory is preparing to co-host LabHack, a 26-hour long coding competition which will task coding-savvy individuals, or “hackers,” to creatively solve challenges that AFRL researchers face every day. The Air Force’s first ‘Hackathon’ event –produced by AFRL, the Wright Brothers Institute, and Code for Dayton, part of the Code for America Brigade Program–will take place Oct. 25-26 at the Tec^Edge Innovation and Collaboration Center in Dayton, Ohio. http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123427433

October 6, 2014

New way to make foams could lead to lightweight, sustainable materials A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a new type of foam – called capillary foam – that solves many of the problems faced by traditional foams. The new research shows for the first time that the combined presence of particles and a small amount of oil in water-based foams can lead to exceptional foam stability when neither the particles nor the oil can stabilize the foams alone. This research is supported by the Renewable Bioproducts Institute of Georgia Tech, by the National Science Foundation, and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). http://www.research.gatech.edu/news/new-way-make-foams-could-lead-lightweight-sustainable-materials